Does higher peer socio-economic status predict children's language and executive function skills gains in prekindergarten?

Christina Weiland, Hirokazu Yoshikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Because most public preschool programs are means tested, children enrolled in these programs accordingly have peers from predominantly low-income families who present lower cognitive skills and more behavioral problems, on average. The present study examined the role of having a higher percentage of peers from higher-SES families on gains in children's receptive vocabulary and executive function skills at the end of prekindergarten. Participants included 417 children attending a prekindergarten program that is not means tested. Findings indicated that having a higher percentage of peers from higher-SES families showed small, positive associations with greater gains in end-of-prekindergarten receptive vocabulary and executive function skills. Results are discussed in the context of current proposals to increase access to publicly funded preschool for higher-income families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)422-432
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Executive function
  • Peer effects
  • Prekindergarten
  • Preschool
  • Vocabulary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Does higher peer socio-economic status predict children's language and executive function skills gains in prekindergarten?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this