Do urban voters in India vote less?

Kanchan Chandra, Alan Potter

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The conventional wisdom that urban voters in India vote less, the authors argue, rests on a shaky empirical foundation: they describe the errors and biases associated with three main methods of estimating urban turnout in India, and note that, even when taken at face value, these measures tell us only about metropolitan India, but not about small towns. Then, they use new data to argue that urbanisation in parliamentary elections since at least 1980 is associated, other things being equal, with lower turnout within but not across states, and that within states, this negative relationship holds for the smaller towns as well as metropolitan cities since at least 1989.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)58-68
    Number of pages11
    JournalEconomic and Political Weekly
    Volume51
    Issue number39
    StatePublished - Sep 24 2016

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    voter
    small town
    India
    parliamentary election
    wisdom
    urbanization
    trend
    Voters
    Vote
    Turnout
    Urbanization
    Wisdom
    Elections

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science
    • Political Science and International Relations
    • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

    Cite this

    Chandra, K., & Potter, A. (2016). Do urban voters in India vote less? Economic and Political Weekly, 51(39), 58-68.

    Do urban voters in India vote less? / Chandra, Kanchan; Potter, Alan.

    In: Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 51, No. 39, 24.09.2016, p. 58-68.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Chandra, K & Potter, A 2016, 'Do urban voters in India vote less?', Economic and Political Weekly, vol. 51, no. 39, pp. 58-68.
    Chandra K, Potter A. Do urban voters in India vote less? Economic and Political Weekly. 2016 Sep 24;51(39):58-68.
    Chandra, Kanchan ; Potter, Alan. / Do urban voters in India vote less?. In: Economic and Political Weekly. 2016 ; Vol. 51, No. 39. pp. 58-68.
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