Do Unto Others as Others Have Done Unto You?

Perceiving Sexism Influences Women's Evaluations of Stigmatized Racial Groups

Maureen Alyson Craig, Tracy DeHart, Jennifer A. Richeson, Luke Fiedorowicz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present research examines how making discrimination salient influences stigmatized group members' evaluations of other stigmatized groups. Specifically, three studies examine how salient sexism affects women's attitudes toward racial minorities. White women primed with sexism expressed more pro-White (relative to Black and Latino) self-report (Studies 1 and 3) and automatic (Study 2) intergroup bias, compared with White women who were not primed with sexism. Furthermore, group affirmation reduced the pro-White/antiminority bias White women expressed after exposure to sexism (Study 3), suggesting the mediating role of social identity threat. Overall, the results suggest that making discrimination salient triggers social identity threat, rather than a sense of common disadvantage, among stigmatized group members, leading to the derogation of other stigmatized groups. Implications for relations among members of different stigmatized groups are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1107-1119
Number of pages13
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume38
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

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Sexism
Social Identification
Hispanic Americans
Self Report
Research

Keywords

  • discrimination
  • intergroup processes
  • prejudice/stereotyping
  • sexism
  • social identity
  • stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Do Unto Others as Others Have Done Unto You? Perceiving Sexism Influences Women's Evaluations of Stigmatized Racial Groups. / Craig, Maureen Alyson; DeHart, Tracy; Richeson, Jennifer A.; Fiedorowicz, Luke.

In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Vol. 38, No. 9, 09.2012, p. 1107-1119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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