Do tobacco countermarketing campaigns increase adolescent under-reporting of smoking?

Peter A. Messeri, Jane A. Allen, Paul D. Mowery, Cheryl Healton, M. Lyndon Haviland, Julia M. Gable, Susan D. Pedrazzani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study assesses whether a national anti-tobacco campaign for youth could create a social context that would elevate social desirability response bias on surveys, as measured by an increase in under-reporting of smoking. This could give rise to data that falsely suggest a campaign-induced decline in youth smoking, or it could exaggerate campaign effects. Data were obtained from a national sample of 5511 students from 48 high schools that were matched to schools sampled for the 2002 National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS). Self-reported smoking was compared with biochemical indicators of smoking, measured using saliva cotinine. The rate of under-reporting detected was 1.3%. Level of truth® exposure was not related to under-reporting. This study suggests that for high school students, anti-tobacco campaigns are not an important cause of social desirability responses on surveys, and that in general under-reporting smoking is not a major source of error in school-based surveys.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1532-1536
Number of pages5
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

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Tobacco
Smoking
Social Desirability
Students
Cotinine
Saliva
Research Design
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Biochemical validation
  • Cotinine
  • Countermarketing
  • Smoking
  • Social desirability bias
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Messeri, P. A., Allen, J. A., Mowery, P. D., Healton, C., Haviland, M. L., Gable, J. M., & Pedrazzani, S. D. (2007). Do tobacco countermarketing campaigns increase adolescent under-reporting of smoking? Addictive Behaviors, 32(7), 1532-1536. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2006.11.010

Do tobacco countermarketing campaigns increase adolescent under-reporting of smoking? / Messeri, Peter A.; Allen, Jane A.; Mowery, Paul D.; Healton, Cheryl; Haviland, M. Lyndon; Gable, Julia M.; Pedrazzani, Susan D.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 32, No. 7, 07.2007, p. 1532-1536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Messeri, PA, Allen, JA, Mowery, PD, Healton, C, Haviland, ML, Gable, JM & Pedrazzani, SD 2007, 'Do tobacco countermarketing campaigns increase adolescent under-reporting of smoking?', Addictive Behaviors, vol. 32, no. 7, pp. 1532-1536. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2006.11.010
Messeri, Peter A. ; Allen, Jane A. ; Mowery, Paul D. ; Healton, Cheryl ; Haviland, M. Lyndon ; Gable, Julia M. ; Pedrazzani, Susan D. / Do tobacco countermarketing campaigns increase adolescent under-reporting of smoking?. In: Addictive Behaviors. 2007 ; Vol. 32, No. 7. pp. 1532-1536.
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