Do Providers Know What They Do Not Know? A Correlational Study of Knowledge Acquisition and Person-Centered Care

Elizabeth B. Matthews, Victoria Stanhope, Mimi Choy-Brown, Meredith Doherty

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Person-centered care (PCC) is a central feature of health care reform, yet the tools needed to deliver this practice have not been implemented consistently. Person-centered care planning (PCCP) is a treatment planning approach operationalizing the values of recovery. To better understand PCCP implementation, this study examined the relationship between recovery knowledge and self-reported PCCP behaviors among 224 community mental health center staff. Results indicated that increased knowledge decreased the likelihood of endorsing non-recovery implementation barriers and self-reporting a high level of PCCP implementation. Findings suggest that individuals have difficulty assessing their performance, and point to the importance of objective fidelity measures.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)514-520
    Number of pages7
    JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
    Volume54
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

    Fingerprint

    knowledge acquisition
    planning
    human being
    Community Mental Health Centers
    Health Care Reform
    mental health
    health care
    staff
    reform
    community
    performance
    Values

    Keywords

    • Implementation
    • Knowledge
    • Mental health services
    • Training

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Health(social science)
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
    • Psychiatry and Mental health

    Cite this

    Do Providers Know What They Do Not Know? A Correlational Study of Knowledge Acquisition and Person-Centered Care. / Matthews, Elizabeth B.; Stanhope, Victoria; Choy-Brown, Mimi; Doherty, Meredith.

    In: Community Mental Health Journal, Vol. 54, No. 5, 01.07.2018, p. 514-520.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Matthews, Elizabeth B. ; Stanhope, Victoria ; Choy-Brown, Mimi ; Doherty, Meredith. / Do Providers Know What They Do Not Know? A Correlational Study of Knowledge Acquisition and Person-Centered Care. In: Community Mental Health Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 54, No. 5. pp. 514-520.
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