Do people take stimulus correlations into account in visual search?

Manisha Bhardwaj, Ronald Van Den Berg, Wei Ji Ma, Krešimir Josic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In laboratory visual search experiments, distractors are often statistically independent of each other. However, stimuli in more naturalistic settings are often correlated and rarely independent. Here, we examine whether human observers take stimulus correlations into account in orientation target detection. We find that they do, although probably not optimally. In particular, it seems that low distractor correlations are overestimated. Our results might contribute to bridging the gap between artificial and natural visual search tasks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0149402
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Target tracking
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Do people take stimulus correlations into account in visual search? / Bhardwaj, Manisha; Van Den Berg, Ronald; Ma, Wei Ji; Josic, Krešimir.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 3, e0149402, 01.03.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bhardwaj, Manisha ; Van Den Berg, Ronald ; Ma, Wei Ji ; Josic, Krešimir. / Do people take stimulus correlations into account in visual search?. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 3.
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