Do Parents’ Life Experiences Affect the Political and Civic Participation of Their Children? The Case of Draft-Induced Military Service

Tim Johnson, Christopher Dawes

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Myriad studies show that politically-salient events influence civic and political engagement. Yet, on the other hand, decades of research indicate that familial factors mold political and civic dispositions early in life, before an individual experiences political events outside the family. Viewing these two lines of research together, we ask if individuals’ political and civic dispositions might be influenced not solely by their own experiences, but, also, by the experiences of those individuals who create their family environment—namely, their parents. Do parents’ life experiences—before the birth of their children—affect their offspring’s public engagement? To answer that question, we examine how the assignment of military service, via the Vietnam-era Selective Service Lotteries, affected rates of public participation among the children of draft-eligible men. Our analysis finds a negative relationship between a father’s probability of draft-induced military service and his offspring’s public participation. In addition to highlighting how parents’ life experiences can influence the social behavior of their children, this finding challenges the prevailing view that the Vietnam conflict did not contribute to declining civic engagement and it shows how experiences within bureaucratic institutions can yield long-standing effects on politically-relevant behaviors.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)793-816
    Number of pages24
    JournalPolitical Behavior
    Volume38
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

    Fingerprint

    military service
    parents
    participation
    experience
    Vietnam
    disposition
    event
    political factors
    social behavior
    father

    Keywords

    • Bureaucracy
    • Civic Participation
    • Intergenerational Transmission
    • Military Conscription
    • Policy Feedback
    • Vietnam Selective Service Lotteries

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    Do Parents’ Life Experiences Affect the Political and Civic Participation of Their Children? The Case of Draft-Induced Military Service. / Johnson, Tim; Dawes, Christopher.

    In: Political Behavior, Vol. 38, No. 4, 01.12.2016, p. 793-816.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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