Do-it-yourself transparency: Emerging methods of congressional information dissemination

Anne Washington, Derek Willis, Josh Tauberer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The landscape of government information dissemination is fundamentally changing. The United States Congress and other public sector organizations publish many records in digital format. In the digital era, it is not always the government providing free information to the general public. Other organizations are providing it on the Internet at no cost. The economics of digital information argues that information has high production costs but inexpensive reproduction costs. What are the consequences and what are the benefits of do-it-yourself transparency? The three panelists, a professor, a data journalist and an entrepreneur, each bring a different perspective to this aspect of the digital economy. The expert panel has extensive experience with Congressional legislative information. We anticipate a vivid conversation on the theory and practice of government information dissemination and contemporary Internet culture. This panel seeks to identify a new vision of government information policy that includes collaborations between independent publishers and the public sector.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationdg.o 2012 - Proceedings of the 13th Annual International Digital Government Research Conference
Subtitle of host publicationBridging Research and Practice
Pages260-261
Number of pages2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012
Event13th Annual International Digital Government Research Conference: Bridging Research and Practice, dg.o 2012 - College Park, MD, United States
Duration: Jun 4 2012Jun 7 2012

Other

Other13th Annual International Digital Government Research Conference: Bridging Research and Practice, dg.o 2012
CountryUnited States
CityCollege Park, MD
Period6/4/126/7/12

Fingerprint

Information dissemination
Transparency
Internet
Costs
Economics

Keywords

  • congress
  • information policy
  • legislative technology
  • public sector information
  • technology standards
  • transparency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Software

Cite this

Washington, A., Willis, D., & Tauberer, J. (2012). Do-it-yourself transparency: Emerging methods of congressional information dissemination. In dg.o 2012 - Proceedings of the 13th Annual International Digital Government Research Conference: Bridging Research and Practice (pp. 260-261) https://doi.org/10.1145/2307729.2307774

Do-it-yourself transparency : Emerging methods of congressional information dissemination. / Washington, Anne; Willis, Derek; Tauberer, Josh.

dg.o 2012 - Proceedings of the 13th Annual International Digital Government Research Conference: Bridging Research and Practice. 2012. p. 260-261.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Washington, A, Willis, D & Tauberer, J 2012, Do-it-yourself transparency: Emerging methods of congressional information dissemination. in dg.o 2012 - Proceedings of the 13th Annual International Digital Government Research Conference: Bridging Research and Practice. pp. 260-261, 13th Annual International Digital Government Research Conference: Bridging Research and Practice, dg.o 2012, College Park, MD, United States, 6/4/12. https://doi.org/10.1145/2307729.2307774
Washington A, Willis D, Tauberer J. Do-it-yourself transparency: Emerging methods of congressional information dissemination. In dg.o 2012 - Proceedings of the 13th Annual International Digital Government Research Conference: Bridging Research and Practice. 2012. p. 260-261 https://doi.org/10.1145/2307729.2307774
Washington, Anne ; Willis, Derek ; Tauberer, Josh. / Do-it-yourself transparency : Emerging methods of congressional information dissemination. dg.o 2012 - Proceedings of the 13th Annual International Digital Government Research Conference: Bridging Research and Practice. 2012. pp. 260-261
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