Do high-stakes tests improve learning?

Michael Hout, Stuart Elliott, Sara Frueh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The US has long performed at a middling level on international assessments of students' math, reading, and science knowledge, trailing many other high income countries. In their efforts to improve K-12 education, US policymakers have increasingly turned to offering incentives- either to schools, to teachers, or to students themselves- to increase students' standardized test scores. In an effort to answer that question, a recent study by the National Research Council took a comprehensive look at the available research on how incentives affect student learning. The study committee, composed of experts in education, economics, and psychology, examined a range of studies on the effects of many types of incentive programs. What it found was not encouraging: The incentive systems that have been carefully studied have had only small effects, and in many cases no effect, on student learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-38
Number of pages6
JournalIssues in Science and Technology
Volume29
Issue number1
StatePublished - Sep 2012

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learning
incentive
student
incentive system
education
psychology
expert
income
teacher
science
school
economics

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Hout, M., Elliott, S., & Frueh, S. (2012). Do high-stakes tests improve learning? Issues in Science and Technology, 29(1), 33-38.

Do high-stakes tests improve learning? / Hout, Michael; Elliott, Stuart; Frueh, Sara.

In: Issues in Science and Technology, Vol. 29, No. 1, 09.2012, p. 33-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Hout, M, Elliott, S & Frueh, S 2012, 'Do high-stakes tests improve learning?', Issues in Science and Technology, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 33-38.
Hout, Michael ; Elliott, Stuart ; Frueh, Sara. / Do high-stakes tests improve learning?. In: Issues in Science and Technology. 2012 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 33-38.
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