Diversity and education of the nursing workforce 2006-2016

Christine Kovner, Maja Djukic, Jin Jun, Jason Fletcher, Farida K. Fatehi, Carol S. Brewer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, The Future of Nursing, included recommendations to increase nurse diversity, the percent of nurses obtaining a bachelor's degree, and inter-professional education. Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report the progress toward achievement of these recommendations. Methods: We used a longitudinal, multi-state data from four cohorts of nurses newly licensed in 2004 to 2005, 2007 to 2008, 2010 to 2011, and 2014 to 2015 to examine and compare the trends. Discussion: The percentage of males who became licensed increased, from 8.8% in 2004 to 2005 cohort to 13.6% in the 2014 to 2015 cohort. The percentage of white-non-Hispanic nurses who were licensed decreased from 78.9% in 2007 to 2008 to 73.8% in 2014 to 2015. These differences primarily reflect an increase in white-Hispanic nurses. More nurses are obtaining a bachelor's degree as their first professional degree, from 36.6% in 2004 to 2005 cohort to 48.5% in 2014 to 2015 cohort. About 40% of the 2014 to 2015 cohort reported that they learned to work in inter-professional teams. Collegial nurse-physician relations had an upward positive trajectory over time increasing almost 7%. Conclusion: The diversity and education of new nurses have increased, but are short of meeting the IOM recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNursing Outlook
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Nursing Education
Nurses
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
Physician-Nurse Relations
Professional Education
Hispanic Americans
Nursing
Education

Keywords

  • Health economics
  • Health professions education
  • Health services research
  • IOM report
  • Nursing
  • Workforce issues

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Diversity and education of the nursing workforce 2006-2016. / Kovner, Christine; Djukic, Maja; Jun, Jin; Fletcher, Jason; Fatehi, Farida K.; Brewer, Carol S.

In: Nursing Outlook, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kovner, Christine ; Djukic, Maja ; Jun, Jin ; Fletcher, Jason ; Fatehi, Farida K. ; Brewer, Carol S. / Diversity and education of the nursing workforce 2006-2016. In: Nursing Outlook. 2017.
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