Dissociable effect of acute varenicline on tonic versus cue-provoked craving in non-treatment-motivated heavy smokers

Brian Hitsman, Lee Hogarth, Li Jung Tseng, Jordan C. Teige, William G. Shadel, Dana Britt DiBenedetti, Spencer Danto, Theodore C. Lee, Lawrence H. Price, Raymond Niaura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Rationale: The effectiveness of varenicline for smoking cessation has been established, but little is known about the psychological processes that mediate this clinical outcome. Objectives: This study evaluated the effect of a single dose of varenicline on tonic and cue-provoked changes in craving, withdrawal, and affect using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Methods: Following overnight abstinence, 38 non-treatment-motivated smokers received either varenicline 2. mg or matched placebo, then tonic measures of craving, withdrawal, and positive and negative affect were obtained at 30-min intervals. At 4-h post-administration, a cue exposure session obtained the same subjective measures at three time-points following the physical handling of a lit cigarette versus the sharpening and handling of a pencil. Results: At 4-h post-administration, varenicline reduced tonic craving as well as craving across the smoking and neutral cue conditions, relative to placebo. By contrast, the capacity of the smoking cue to enhance craving relative to the neutral cue was unaffected by varenicline. Measures of withdrawal and positive and negative affect produced mixed results. Conclusions: Acute varenicline selectively attenuates tonic but not cue-provoked craving. This dissociation provides insight into the specific psychological processes that might mediate the effectiveness of varenicline, and highlights cue-provoked craving as a discrete target for advancing smoking cessation pharmacotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-141
Number of pages7
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume130
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

Fingerprint

Cues
Placebos
Smoking Cessation
Smoking
Dissociative Disorders
Psychology
Drug therapy
Craving
Varenicline
Tobacco Products
Cross-Over Studies
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • Affect
  • Craving
  • Cue-reactivity
  • Nicotine withdrawal
  • Smoking cessation
  • Varenicline

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Dissociable effect of acute varenicline on tonic versus cue-provoked craving in non-treatment-motivated heavy smokers. / Hitsman, Brian; Hogarth, Lee; Tseng, Li Jung; Teige, Jordan C.; Shadel, William G.; DiBenedetti, Dana Britt; Danto, Spencer; Lee, Theodore C.; Price, Lawrence H.; Niaura, Raymond.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 130, No. 1-3, 01.06.2013, p. 135-141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hitsman, B, Hogarth, L, Tseng, LJ, Teige, JC, Shadel, WG, DiBenedetti, DB, Danto, S, Lee, TC, Price, LH & Niaura, R 2013, 'Dissociable effect of acute varenicline on tonic versus cue-provoked craving in non-treatment-motivated heavy smokers', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 130, no. 1-3, pp. 135-141. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2012.10.021
Hitsman, Brian ; Hogarth, Lee ; Tseng, Li Jung ; Teige, Jordan C. ; Shadel, William G. ; DiBenedetti, Dana Britt ; Danto, Spencer ; Lee, Theodore C. ; Price, Lawrence H. ; Niaura, Raymond. / Dissociable effect of acute varenicline on tonic versus cue-provoked craving in non-treatment-motivated heavy smokers. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2013 ; Vol. 130, No. 1-3. pp. 135-141.
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AU - Shadel, William G.

AU - DiBenedetti, Dana Britt

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