Dissociable contributions of the prefrontal cortex in group-based cooperation

NYU PROSPEC Collaboration

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The success of our political institutions, environmental stewardship and evolutionary fitness all hinge on our ability to prioritize collective-interest over self-interest. Despite considerable interest in the neuro-cognitive processes that underlie group cooperation, the evidence to date is inconsistent. Several papers support models of prosocial restraint, while more recent work supports models of prosocial intuition.We evaluate these competing models using a sample of lesion patients with damage to brain regions previously implicated in intuition and deliberation. Compared to matched control participants (brain damaged and healthy controls), we found that patients with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) damage were less likely to cooperate in a modified public goods game, whereas patients with ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) damage were more likely to cooperate. In contrast, we observed no association between cooperation and amygdala damage relative to controls. These findings suggest that the dlPFC, rather than the vmPFC or amygdala, plays a necessary role in groupbased cooperation. These findings suggest cooperation does not solely rely on intuitive processes. Implications for models of group cooperation are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-356
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

Fingerprint

Prefrontal Cortex
Intuition
Amygdala
Aptitude
Group Processes
Brain

Keywords

  • Cooperation
  • Lesions
  • Prosocial behavior
  • Public goods game

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Dissociable contributions of the prefrontal cortex in group-based cooperation. / NYU PROSPEC Collaboration.

In: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, Vol. 13, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 349-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7ff5571cecc8423fb504abca5a6907b5,
title = "Dissociable contributions of the prefrontal cortex in group-based cooperation",
abstract = "The success of our political institutions, environmental stewardship and evolutionary fitness all hinge on our ability to prioritize collective-interest over self-interest. Despite considerable interest in the neuro-cognitive processes that underlie group cooperation, the evidence to date is inconsistent. Several papers support models of prosocial restraint, while more recent work supports models of prosocial intuition.We evaluate these competing models using a sample of lesion patients with damage to brain regions previously implicated in intuition and deliberation. Compared to matched control participants (brain damaged and healthy controls), we found that patients with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) damage were less likely to cooperate in a modified public goods game, whereas patients with ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) damage were more likely to cooperate. In contrast, we observed no association between cooperation and amygdala damage relative to controls. These findings suggest that the dlPFC, rather than the vmPFC or amygdala, plays a necessary role in groupbased cooperation. These findings suggest cooperation does not solely rely on intuitive processes. Implications for models of group cooperation are discussed.",
keywords = "Cooperation, Lesions, Prosocial behavior, Public goods game",
author = "{NYU PROSPEC Collaboration} and Julian Wills and Oriel FeldmanHall and Meager, {Michael R.} and {Van Bavel}, Jay and Karen Blackmon and Orrin Devinsky and Doyle, {Werner K.} and Luciano, {Daniel J.} and Kuzniecky, {Ruben I.} and Nadkarni, {Siddhartha S.} and Blanca Vazquez and Soul Najjar and Eric Geller and Golfinos, {John G.} and Placantonakis, {Dimitris G.} and Daniel Friedman and Wisoff, {Jeffrey H.} and Uzma Samadani",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/scan/nsy023",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
pages = "349--356",
journal = "Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience",
issn = "1749-5024",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dissociable contributions of the prefrontal cortex in group-based cooperation

AU - NYU PROSPEC Collaboration

AU - Wills, Julian

AU - FeldmanHall, Oriel

AU - Meager, Michael R.

AU - Van Bavel, Jay

AU - Blackmon, Karen

AU - Devinsky, Orrin

AU - Doyle, Werner K.

AU - Luciano, Daniel J.

AU - Kuzniecky, Ruben I.

AU - Nadkarni, Siddhartha S.

AU - Vazquez, Blanca

AU - Najjar, Soul

AU - Geller, Eric

AU - Golfinos, John G.

AU - Placantonakis, Dimitris G.

AU - Friedman, Daniel

AU - Wisoff, Jeffrey H.

AU - Samadani, Uzma

PY - 2018/4/1

Y1 - 2018/4/1

N2 - The success of our political institutions, environmental stewardship and evolutionary fitness all hinge on our ability to prioritize collective-interest over self-interest. Despite considerable interest in the neuro-cognitive processes that underlie group cooperation, the evidence to date is inconsistent. Several papers support models of prosocial restraint, while more recent work supports models of prosocial intuition.We evaluate these competing models using a sample of lesion patients with damage to brain regions previously implicated in intuition and deliberation. Compared to matched control participants (brain damaged and healthy controls), we found that patients with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) damage were less likely to cooperate in a modified public goods game, whereas patients with ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) damage were more likely to cooperate. In contrast, we observed no association between cooperation and amygdala damage relative to controls. These findings suggest that the dlPFC, rather than the vmPFC or amygdala, plays a necessary role in groupbased cooperation. These findings suggest cooperation does not solely rely on intuitive processes. Implications for models of group cooperation are discussed.

AB - The success of our political institutions, environmental stewardship and evolutionary fitness all hinge on our ability to prioritize collective-interest over self-interest. Despite considerable interest in the neuro-cognitive processes that underlie group cooperation, the evidence to date is inconsistent. Several papers support models of prosocial restraint, while more recent work supports models of prosocial intuition.We evaluate these competing models using a sample of lesion patients with damage to brain regions previously implicated in intuition and deliberation. Compared to matched control participants (brain damaged and healthy controls), we found that patients with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) damage were less likely to cooperate in a modified public goods game, whereas patients with ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) damage were more likely to cooperate. In contrast, we observed no association between cooperation and amygdala damage relative to controls. These findings suggest that the dlPFC, rather than the vmPFC or amygdala, plays a necessary role in groupbased cooperation. These findings suggest cooperation does not solely rely on intuitive processes. Implications for models of group cooperation are discussed.

KW - Cooperation

KW - Lesions

KW - Prosocial behavior

KW - Public goods game

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85047944820&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85047944820&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/scan/nsy023

DO - 10.1093/scan/nsy023

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 349

EP - 356

JO - Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

JF - Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

SN - 1749-5024

IS - 4

ER -