Disrupting education? Experimental evidence on technology-aided instruction in India

Karthik Muralidharan, Abhijeet Singh, Alejandro Ganimian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We study the impact of a personalized technology-aided after-school instruction program in middle-school grades in urban India using a lottery that provided winners with free access to the program. Lottery winners scored 0.37 σ higher in math and 0.23 σ higher in Hindi over just a 4.5-month period. IV estimates suggest that attending the program for 90 days would increase math and Hindi test scores by 0.6 σ and 0.39 σ respectively. We find similar absolute test score gains for all students, but much greater relative gains for academically-weaker students. Our results suggest that well-designed, technology-aided instruction programs can sharply improve productivity in delivering education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1426-1460
Number of pages35
JournalAmerican Economic Review
Volume109
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

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India
Education
Test scores
Lottery
Productivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics

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Disrupting education? Experimental evidence on technology-aided instruction in India. / Muralidharan, Karthik; Singh, Abhijeet; Ganimian, Alejandro.

In: American Economic Review, Vol. 109, No. 4, 01.04.2019, p. 1426-1460.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muralidharan, Karthik ; Singh, Abhijeet ; Ganimian, Alejandro. / Disrupting education? Experimental evidence on technology-aided instruction in India. In: American Economic Review. 2019 ; Vol. 109, No. 4. pp. 1426-1460.
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