Disparity- and velocity-based signals for three-dimensional motion perception in human MT+

Bas Rokers, Lawrence K. Cormack, Alexander C. Huk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

How does the primate visual system encode three-dimensional motion? The macaque middle temporal area (MT) and the human MT complex (MT+) have well-established sensitivity to two-dimensional frontoparallel motion and static disparity. However, evidence for sensitivity to three-dimensional motion has remained elusive. We found that human MT+ encodes two binocular cues to three-dimensional motion: changing disparities over time and interocular comparisons of retinal velocities. By varying important properties of moving dot displays, we distinguished these three-dimensional motion signals from their constituents, instantaneous binocular disparity and monocular retinal motion. An adaptation experiment confirmed direction selectivity for three-dimensional motion. Our results indicate that MT+ carries critical binocular signals for three-dimensional motion processing, revealing an important and previously overlooked role for this well-studied brain area.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1050-1055
Number of pages6
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume12
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009

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Motion Perception
Vision Disparity
Macaca
Primates
Cues
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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Disparity- and velocity-based signals for three-dimensional motion perception in human MT+. / Rokers, Bas; Cormack, Lawrence K.; Huk, Alexander C.

In: Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 12, No. 8, 01.08.2009, p. 1050-1055.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rokers, Bas ; Cormack, Lawrence K. ; Huk, Alexander C. / Disparity- and velocity-based signals for three-dimensional motion perception in human MT+. In: Nature Neuroscience. 2009 ; Vol. 12, No. 8. pp. 1050-1055.
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