Disparities in Sleep Problems by Sexual Orientation among New York City Adults: an Analysis of the New York City Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2013–2014

Dustin T. Duncan, Rania Kanchi, Lawrence Tantay, Marta Hernandez, Carl Letamendi, Claudia Chernov, Lorna Thorpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined disparities in sleep problems by sexual orientation among a population-based sample of adults, using data from the New York City (NYC) Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NYC HANES), a population-based, cross-sectional survey conducted in 2013–2014 (n = 1220). Two log binomial regression models were created to assess the relative prevalence of sleep problems by sexual orientation. In model 1, heterosexual adults served as the reference category, controlling for gender, age, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, and family income. And in model 2, heterosexual men served as the reference category, controlling for age, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, and family income. We found that almost 42% of NYC adults reported sleep problems in the past 2 weeks. Bisexual adults had 1.4 times the relative risk of sleep problems compared to heterosexual adults (p = 0.037). Compared to heterosexual men, heterosexual and bisexual women had 1.3 and 1.6 times the risk of sleep problems, respectively (p < 0.05). Overall, adults who self-identified as bisexual had a significantly greater risk of sleep problems than adults who self-identified as heterosexual.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)781-786
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Urban Health
Volume95
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2018

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Keywords

  • Health disparities
  • Health equity
  • Lesbian, gay, bisexual (LGB) health
  • New York City
  • Sleep problems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Urban Studies
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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