Disparities in oral and pharyngeal cancer incidence, mortality and survival among black and white Americans

Douglas E. Morse, A. Ross Kerr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. The authors present statistics and long-term trends in oral and pharyngeal cancer (OPC) incidence, mortality and survival among U.S. blacks and whites. Methods. The authors obtained incidence, mortality and five-year relative survival rates via the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program Web site. Current rates and time trends for 1975 through 2002 are presented. Results. From 1975 through 2002, age-adjusted incidence rates (AAIRs) and mortality rates (AAMRs) were higner among males than among females and highest for black males. By the mid-1980s, incidence and mortality rates were declining for black and white males and females; however, disparities persisted. During the period 1998-2002, AAIRs were more than 20 percent higher for black males compared with white males, while the difference in rates for black and white females was small. AAMRs were 82 percent higher for black males compared with white males, but rates were similar for black and white females. Five-year relative survival rates for patients diagnosed during the period 1995-2001 were higher for whites titan for blacks and lowest for black males. Conclusions. Despite recent declines in OPC incidence and mortality rates, disparities persist. Disparities in survival also exist. Black males bear the brunt of these disparities. Practice Implications. Dentists can aid in reducing OPC incidence and mortality by assisting patients in the prevention and cessation of tobacco use and alcohol abuse. Five-year relative survival may be improved through early detection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-212
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Dental Association
Volume137
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 2006

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Pharyngeal Neoplasms
Mouth Neoplasms
Survival
Mortality
Incidence
Survival Rate
Saturn
SEER Program
Tobacco Use Cessation
Ursidae
hydroquinone
Dentists
Alcoholism

Keywords

  • Incidence
  • Mortality
  • Oral cancer
  • Pharyngeal cancer
  • Survival
  • Trends

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Disparities in oral and pharyngeal cancer incidence, mortality and survival among black and white Americans. / Morse, Douglas E.; Kerr, A. Ross.

In: Journal of the American Dental Association, Vol. 137, No. 2, 02.2006, p. 203-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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