Disordered eating attitudes and behaviors, psychological adjustment, and ethnic identity: A comparison of black and white female college students

K. K. Abrams, LaRue Allen, J. J. Gray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The low prevalence of restrictive eating disorders among black women has been attributed primarily to cultural differences in the definition of beauty. Utilizing self-report measures, this study examined differences in the nature of disordered eating behaviors for black and for white female college students. Analyses of covariance and correlational tests revealed that white females demonstrated significantly greater disordered eating attitudes and behaviors than black females. Additionally, the data indicated that although disordered eating behaviors and attitudes are related to actual weight problems for black females, this is not the case for white females. Furthermore, this study is the first to provide evidence that restrictive eating disorders among black women are related to the degree to which they assimilate to mainstream culture. Finally disordered eating behaviors and attitudes were related to depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem in both groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-57
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume14
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1993

Fingerprint

eating disorders
Feeding Behavior
college students
eating habits
Students
Beauty
Self Concept
cultural differences
Self Report
self-esteem
Anxiety
anxiety
Emotional Adjustment
hydroquinone
Depression
Weights and Measures
Feeding and Eating Disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

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