Dirty desktops: Using a patina of magnetic mouse dust to make common interactor targets easier to select

Amy Hurst, Jennifer Mankoff, Anind K. Dey, Scott E. Hudson

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

A common task in graphical user interfaces is controlling onscreen elements using a pointer. Current adaptive pointing techniques require applications to be built using accessibility libraries that reveal information about interactive targets, and most do not handle path/menu navigation. We present a pseudo-haptic technique that is OS and application independent, and can handle both dragging and clicking. We do this by associating a small force with each past click or drag. When a user frequently clicks in the same general area (e.g., on a button), the patina of past clicks naturally creates a pseudo-haptic magnetic field with an effect similar to that ofsnapping or sticky icons. Our contribution is a bottom-up approach to make targets easier to select without requiring prior knowledge of them.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages183-186
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Event20th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2007 - Newport, RI, United States
Duration: Oct 7 2007Oct 10 2007

Conference

Conference20th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2007
CountryUnited States
CityNewport, RI
Period10/7/0710/10/07

Fingerprint

Dust
Graphical user interfaces
Drag
Navigation
Magnetic fields

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Mouse
  • Pointer
  • Snapping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Hurst, A., Mankoff, J., Dey, A. K., & Hudson, S. E. (2007). Dirty desktops: Using a patina of magnetic mouse dust to make common interactor targets easier to select. 183-186. Paper presented at 20th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2007, Newport, RI, United States. https://doi.org/10.1145/1294211.1294242

Dirty desktops : Using a patina of magnetic mouse dust to make common interactor targets easier to select. / Hurst, Amy; Mankoff, Jennifer; Dey, Anind K.; Hudson, Scott E.

2007. 183-186 Paper presented at 20th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2007, Newport, RI, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Hurst, A, Mankoff, J, Dey, AK & Hudson, SE 2007, 'Dirty desktops: Using a patina of magnetic mouse dust to make common interactor targets easier to select', Paper presented at 20th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2007, Newport, RI, United States, 10/7/07 - 10/10/07 pp. 183-186. https://doi.org/10.1145/1294211.1294242
Hurst A, Mankoff J, Dey AK, Hudson SE. Dirty desktops: Using a patina of magnetic mouse dust to make common interactor targets easier to select. 2007. Paper presented at 20th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2007, Newport, RI, United States. https://doi.org/10.1145/1294211.1294242
Hurst, Amy ; Mankoff, Jennifer ; Dey, Anind K. ; Hudson, Scott E. / Dirty desktops : Using a patina of magnetic mouse dust to make common interactor targets easier to select. Paper presented at 20th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2007, Newport, RI, United States.4 p.
@conference{0e5672377ca54a4f98c8470bede52d4a,
title = "Dirty desktops: Using a patina of magnetic mouse dust to make common interactor targets easier to select",
abstract = "A common task in graphical user interfaces is controlling onscreen elements using a pointer. Current adaptive pointing techniques require applications to be built using accessibility libraries that reveal information about interactive targets, and most do not handle path/menu navigation. We present a pseudo-haptic technique that is OS and application independent, and can handle both dragging and clicking. We do this by associating a small force with each past click or drag. When a user frequently clicks in the same general area (e.g., on a button), the patina of past clicks naturally creates a pseudo-haptic magnetic field with an effect similar to that ofsnapping or sticky icons. Our contribution is a bottom-up approach to make targets easier to select without requiring prior knowledge of them.",
keywords = "Adaptation, Mouse, Pointer, Snapping",
author = "Amy Hurst and Jennifer Mankoff and Dey, {Anind K.} and Hudson, {Scott E.}",
year = "2007",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1145/1294211.1294242",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "183--186",
note = "20th Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, UIST 2007 ; Conference date: 07-10-2007 Through 10-10-2007",

}

TY - CONF

T1 - Dirty desktops

T2 - Using a patina of magnetic mouse dust to make common interactor targets easier to select

AU - Hurst, Amy

AU - Mankoff, Jennifer

AU - Dey, Anind K.

AU - Hudson, Scott E.

PY - 2007/12/1

Y1 - 2007/12/1

N2 - A common task in graphical user interfaces is controlling onscreen elements using a pointer. Current adaptive pointing techniques require applications to be built using accessibility libraries that reveal information about interactive targets, and most do not handle path/menu navigation. We present a pseudo-haptic technique that is OS and application independent, and can handle both dragging and clicking. We do this by associating a small force with each past click or drag. When a user frequently clicks in the same general area (e.g., on a button), the patina of past clicks naturally creates a pseudo-haptic magnetic field with an effect similar to that ofsnapping or sticky icons. Our contribution is a bottom-up approach to make targets easier to select without requiring prior knowledge of them.

AB - A common task in graphical user interfaces is controlling onscreen elements using a pointer. Current adaptive pointing techniques require applications to be built using accessibility libraries that reveal information about interactive targets, and most do not handle path/menu navigation. We present a pseudo-haptic technique that is OS and application independent, and can handle both dragging and clicking. We do this by associating a small force with each past click or drag. When a user frequently clicks in the same general area (e.g., on a button), the patina of past clicks naturally creates a pseudo-haptic magnetic field with an effect similar to that ofsnapping or sticky icons. Our contribution is a bottom-up approach to make targets easier to select without requiring prior knowledge of them.

KW - Adaptation

KW - Mouse

KW - Pointer

KW - Snapping

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=41149139747&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=41149139747&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1145/1294211.1294242

DO - 10.1145/1294211.1294242

M3 - Paper

AN - SCOPUS:41149139747

SP - 183

EP - 186

ER -