Directing the structure of matter through DNA nanotechnology

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Unusual motifs of DNA present an extremely favorable construction medium: The sticky-ended association of DNA molecules occurs with high specificity, and it results in the formation of BDNA, whose structure is well known. The use of stable branched DNA molecules permits one to make stick-figures. We have used this strategy to construct a covalently closed DNA molecule whose helix axes have the connectivity of a cube, and a second molecule, whose helix axes have the connectivity of a truncated octahedron. In addition to branching topology, DNA also affords control of linking topology, because double helical half-turns of B-DNA or Z-DNA can be equated, respectively, with negative or positive crossings in topological objects. Consequently, we have been able to use DNA to make trefoil knots of both signs and figure-8 knots. DNA-based topological control has also led to the construction of Borromean rings. The key feature previously lacking in DNA construction has been a rigid molecule. We have discovered that antiparallel DNA double crossover molecules can provide this capability. We have incorporated these components in DNA assemblies that make use of this rigidity to achieve control on the geometrical level, as well as on the topological level. Rigid components have allowed us to construct a nanomechanical device, predicated on a DNA structural transition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE International Joint Symposia on Intelligence and Systems
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages146-150
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)078034863X, 9780780348639
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
Event1998 IEEE International Joint Symposia on Intelligence and Systems - Rockville, United States
Duration: May 21 1998May 23 1998

Other

Other1998 IEEE International Joint Symposia on Intelligence and Systems
CountryUnited States
CityRockville
Period5/21/985/23/98

Fingerprint

Nanotechnology
DNA
Molecules
Topology
Rigidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Signal Processing

Cite this

Seeman, N. (1998). Directing the structure of matter through DNA nanotechnology. In Proceedings - IEEE International Joint Symposia on Intelligence and Systems (pp. 146-150). [685432] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/IJSIS.1998.685432

Directing the structure of matter through DNA nanotechnology. / Seeman, Nadrian.

Proceedings - IEEE International Joint Symposia on Intelligence and Systems. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 1998. p. 146-150 685432.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Seeman, N 1998, Directing the structure of matter through DNA nanotechnology. in Proceedings - IEEE International Joint Symposia on Intelligence and Systems., 685432, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 146-150, 1998 IEEE International Joint Symposia on Intelligence and Systems, Rockville, United States, 5/21/98. https://doi.org/10.1109/IJSIS.1998.685432
Seeman N. Directing the structure of matter through DNA nanotechnology. In Proceedings - IEEE International Joint Symposia on Intelligence and Systems. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 1998. p. 146-150. 685432 https://doi.org/10.1109/IJSIS.1998.685432
Seeman, Nadrian. / Directing the structure of matter through DNA nanotechnology. Proceedings - IEEE International Joint Symposia on Intelligence and Systems. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 1998. pp. 146-150
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