Dionysopithecus from southern Pakistan and the biochronology and biogeography of early Eurasian catarrhines

Raymond L. Bernor, Lawrence J. Flynn, Terry Harrison, S. Taseer Hussain, Jay Kelley

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    New specimens of a small, advanced catarrhine primate from the Manchar Formation in Sind, southern Pakistan, are referred to Dionysopithecus sp. Their age is biochronologically estimated to be close to the early/middle Miocene boundary. Dionysopithecus is considered closely related to, and possibly congeneric with, Micropithecus from the East African early Miocene. The Manchar Dionysopithecus is among the earliest of Eurasian catarrhines. Catarrhines may have first emigrated from Afro-Arabia around 16·5 Ma, coincident with a major short-term eustatic sea level lowering event, and with the earliest records in South Asia of certain other African mammal groups. The first appearances in Eurasia of later, more advanced catarrhine lineages also appear to correlate with episodes of global sea level lowering.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)339-358
    Number of pages20
    JournalJournal of Human Evolution
    Volume17
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1988

    Fingerprint

    biochronology
    biogeography
    Pakistan
    sea level
    Miocene
    South Asia
    Eurasia
    primate
    Primates
    mammal
    mammals
    event
    Group
    Asia

    Keywords

    • biochronology
    • biogeography
    • Catarrhine
    • Miocene
    • Pakistan

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

    Cite this

    Dionysopithecus from southern Pakistan and the biochronology and biogeography of early Eurasian catarrhines. / Bernor, Raymond L.; Flynn, Lawrence J.; Harrison, Terry; Hussain, S. Taseer; Kelley, Jay.

    In: Journal of Human Evolution, Vol. 17, No. 3, 1988, p. 339-358.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Bernor, Raymond L. ; Flynn, Lawrence J. ; Harrison, Terry ; Hussain, S. Taseer ; Kelley, Jay. / Dionysopithecus from southern Pakistan and the biochronology and biogeography of early Eurasian catarrhines. In: Journal of Human Evolution. 1988 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 339-358.
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