Digital immolation

New directions for online protest

Joseph Bonneau

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The current literature and experience of online activism assumes two basic uses of the Internet for social movements: straightforward extensions of offline organising and fund-raising using online media to improve efficiency and reach, or “hacktivism” using technical knowledge to illegally deface or disrupt access to online resources. We propose a third model which is non-violent yet proves commitment to a cause by enabling a group of activists to temporarily or permanently sacrifice valuable online identities such as email accounts, social networking profiles, or gaming avatars. We describe a basic cryptographic framework for enabling such a protest, which provides an additional property of binding solidarity which is not normally possible offline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSecurity Protocols XVIII - 18th International Workshop, Revised Selected Papers
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages25-33
Number of pages9
Volume7061
ISBN (Electronic)9783662459201
StatePublished - 2014
Event18th International Workshop Security Protocols - Cambridge, United Kingdom
Duration: Mar 24 2010Mar 26 2010

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume7061
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other18th International Workshop Security Protocols
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityCambridge
Period3/24/103/26/10

Fingerprint

Electronic mail
Internet
Avatar
Social Networking
Gaming
Electronic Mail
Resources
Model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Bonneau, J. (2014). Digital immolation: New directions for online protest. In Security Protocols XVIII - 18th International Workshop, Revised Selected Papers (Vol. 7061, pp. 25-33). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 7061). Springer Verlag.

Digital immolation : New directions for online protest. / Bonneau, Joseph.

Security Protocols XVIII - 18th International Workshop, Revised Selected Papers. Vol. 7061 Springer Verlag, 2014. p. 25-33 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 7061).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Bonneau, J 2014, Digital immolation: New directions for online protest. in Security Protocols XVIII - 18th International Workshop, Revised Selected Papers. vol. 7061, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 7061, Springer Verlag, pp. 25-33, 18th International Workshop Security Protocols, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 3/24/10.
Bonneau J. Digital immolation: New directions for online protest. In Security Protocols XVIII - 18th International Workshop, Revised Selected Papers. Vol. 7061. Springer Verlag. 2014. p. 25-33. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
Bonneau, Joseph. / Digital immolation : New directions for online protest. Security Protocols XVIII - 18th International Workshop, Revised Selected Papers. Vol. 7061 Springer Verlag, 2014. pp. 25-33 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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