Differential sensory fMRI signatures in autism and schizophrenia: Analysis of amplitude and trial-to-trial variability

Sarah M. Haigh, Akshat Gupta, Scott M. Barb, Summer A F Glass, Nancy J. Minshew, Ilan Dinstein, David Heeger, Shaun M. Eack, Marlene Behrmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Autism and schizophrenia share multiple phenotypic and genotypic markers, and there is ongoing debate regarding the relationship of these two disorders. To examine whether cortical dynamics are similar across these disorders, we directly compared fMRI responses to visual, somatosensory and auditory stimuli in adults with autism (N = 15), with schizophrenia (N = 15), and matched controls (N = 15). All participants completed a one-back letter detection task presented at fixation (to control attention) while task-irrelevant sensory stimulation was delivered to the different modalities. We focused specifically on the response amplitudes and the variability in sensory fMRI responses of the two groups, given the evidence of greater trial-to-trial variability in adults with autism. Both autism and schizophrenia individuals showed weaker signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) in sensory-evoked responses compared to controls (d. >. 0.42), but for different reasons. For the autism group, the fMRI response amplitudes were indistinguishable from controls but were more variable trial-to-trial (d = 0.47). For the schizophrenia group, response amplitudes were smaller compared to autism (d = 0.44) and control groups (d = 0.74), but were not significantly more variable (d.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSchizophrenia Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 7 2015

Fingerprint

Autistic Disorder
Schizophrenia
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Autism
  • FMRI
  • Schizophrenia
  • Sensory perception
  • Variability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Haigh, S. M., Gupta, A., Barb, S. M., Glass, S. A. F., Minshew, N. J., Dinstein, I., ... Behrmann, M. (Accepted/In press). Differential sensory fMRI signatures in autism and schizophrenia: Analysis of amplitude and trial-to-trial variability. Schizophrenia Research. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2016.03.036

Differential sensory fMRI signatures in autism and schizophrenia : Analysis of amplitude and trial-to-trial variability. / Haigh, Sarah M.; Gupta, Akshat; Barb, Scott M.; Glass, Summer A F; Minshew, Nancy J.; Dinstein, Ilan; Heeger, David; Eack, Shaun M.; Behrmann, Marlene.

In: Schizophrenia Research, 07.11.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haigh, Sarah M. ; Gupta, Akshat ; Barb, Scott M. ; Glass, Summer A F ; Minshew, Nancy J. ; Dinstein, Ilan ; Heeger, David ; Eack, Shaun M. ; Behrmann, Marlene. / Differential sensory fMRI signatures in autism and schizophrenia : Analysis of amplitude and trial-to-trial variability. In: Schizophrenia Research. 2015.
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