Differential modulatory actions of serotonin in Aplysia sensory neurons: Implications for development and learning

N. J. Emptage, E. A. Marcus, L. L. Stark, T. J. Carew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We have addressed whether mechanisms of adult plasticity reflect conserved forms of developmental processes by comparing the effects of serotonin (5HT) in juvenile and adult Aplysia sensory neurons. We show that the effects of 5HT can be dissociated into two functional classes which (i) contribute differentially to short- and long-term synaptic plasticity in adults and (ii) emerge differentially during development. We propose a model in which one class of mechanism mediates structural changes early in development and is retained in the adult to subserve long-term memory, while the second class develops late and contributes only to short-term memory in the adult.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-33
Number of pages13
JournalSeminars in the Neurosciences
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Aplysia
Neuronal Plasticity
Long-Term Memory
Sensory Receptor Cells
Short-Term Memory
Serotonin
Learning

Keywords

  • Aplysia
  • Development
  • Learning
  • Serotonin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Differential modulatory actions of serotonin in Aplysia sensory neurons : Implications for development and learning. / Emptage, N. J.; Marcus, E. A.; Stark, L. L.; Carew, T. J.

In: Seminars in the Neurosciences, Vol. 6, No. 1, 1994, p. 21-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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