Differences in the symptom experience of older versus younger oncology outpatients: A cross-sectional study

Janine K. Cataldo, Steven Paul, Bruce Cooper, Helen Skerman, Kimberly Alexander, Bradley Aouizerat, Virginia Blackman, John Merriman, Laura Dunn, Christine Ritchie, Patsy Yates, Christine Miaskowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Mortality rates for cancer are decreasing in patients under 60 and increasing in those over 60 years of age. The reasons for these differences in mortality rates remain poorly understood. One explanation may be that older patients received substandard treatment because of concerns about adverse effects. Given the paucity of research on the multiple dimensions of the symptom experience in older oncology patients, the purpose of this study was to evaluate for differences in ratings of symptom occurrence, severity, frequency, and distress between younger (<60 years) and older ( ≥ 60 years) adults undergoing cancer treatment. We hypothesized that older patients would have significantly lower ratings on four symptom dimensions.Methods: Data from two studies in the United States and one study in Australia were combined to conduct this analysis. All three studies used the MSAS to evaluate the occurrence, severity, frequency, and distress of 32 symptoms.Results: Data from 593 oncology outpatients receiving active treatment for their cancer (i.e., 44.4% were <60 years and 55.6% were ≥ 60 years of age) were evaluated. Of the 32 MSAS symptoms, after controlling for significant covariates, older patients reported significantly lower occurrence rates for 15 (46.9%) symptoms, lower severity ratings for 6 (18.9%) symptoms, lower frequency ratings for 4 (12.5%) symptoms, and lower distress ratings for 14 (43.8%) symptoms.Conclusions: This study is the first to evaluate for differences in multiple dimensions of symptom experience in older oncology patients. For almost 50% of the MSAS symptoms, older patients reported significantly lower occurrence rates. While fewer age-related differences were found in ratings of symptom severity, frequency, and distress, a similar pattern was found across all three dimensions. Future research needs to focus on a detailed evaluation of patient and clinical characteristics (i.e., type and dose of treatment) that explain the differences in symptom experience identified in this study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6
JournalBMC Cancer
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 3 2013

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Outpatients
Cross-Sectional Studies
Neoplasms
Mortality
Therapeutics
Research

Keywords

  • Geriatric oncology
  • Symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research
  • Genetics

Cite this

Differences in the symptom experience of older versus younger oncology outpatients : A cross-sectional study. / Cataldo, Janine K.; Paul, Steven; Cooper, Bruce; Skerman, Helen; Alexander, Kimberly; Aouizerat, Bradley; Blackman, Virginia; Merriman, John; Dunn, Laura; Ritchie, Christine; Yates, Patsy; Miaskowski, Christine.

In: BMC Cancer, Vol. 13, 6, 03.01.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cataldo, JK, Paul, S, Cooper, B, Skerman, H, Alexander, K, Aouizerat, B, Blackman, V, Merriman, J, Dunn, L, Ritchie, C, Yates, P & Miaskowski, C 2013, 'Differences in the symptom experience of older versus younger oncology outpatients: A cross-sectional study', BMC Cancer, vol. 13, 6. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2407-13-6
Cataldo, Janine K. ; Paul, Steven ; Cooper, Bruce ; Skerman, Helen ; Alexander, Kimberly ; Aouizerat, Bradley ; Blackman, Virginia ; Merriman, John ; Dunn, Laura ; Ritchie, Christine ; Yates, Patsy ; Miaskowski, Christine. / Differences in the symptom experience of older versus younger oncology outpatients : A cross-sectional study. In: BMC Cancer. 2013 ; Vol. 13.
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abstract = "Background: Mortality rates for cancer are decreasing in patients under 60 and increasing in those over 60 years of age. The reasons for these differences in mortality rates remain poorly understood. One explanation may be that older patients received substandard treatment because of concerns about adverse effects. Given the paucity of research on the multiple dimensions of the symptom experience in older oncology patients, the purpose of this study was to evaluate for differences in ratings of symptom occurrence, severity, frequency, and distress between younger (<60 years) and older ( ≥ 60 years) adults undergoing cancer treatment. We hypothesized that older patients would have significantly lower ratings on four symptom dimensions.Methods: Data from two studies in the United States and one study in Australia were combined to conduct this analysis. All three studies used the MSAS to evaluate the occurrence, severity, frequency, and distress of 32 symptoms.Results: Data from 593 oncology outpatients receiving active treatment for their cancer (i.e., 44.4{\%} were <60 years and 55.6{\%} were ≥ 60 years of age) were evaluated. Of the 32 MSAS symptoms, after controlling for significant covariates, older patients reported significantly lower occurrence rates for 15 (46.9{\%}) symptoms, lower severity ratings for 6 (18.9{\%}) symptoms, lower frequency ratings for 4 (12.5{\%}) symptoms, and lower distress ratings for 14 (43.8{\%}) symptoms.Conclusions: This study is the first to evaluate for differences in multiple dimensions of symptom experience in older oncology patients. For almost 50{\%} of the MSAS symptoms, older patients reported significantly lower occurrence rates. While fewer age-related differences were found in ratings of symptom severity, frequency, and distress, a similar pattern was found across all three dimensions. Future research needs to focus on a detailed evaluation of patient and clinical characteristics (i.e., type and dose of treatment) that explain the differences in symptom experience identified in this study.",
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T1 - Differences in the symptom experience of older versus younger oncology outpatients

T2 - A cross-sectional study

AU - Cataldo, Janine K.

AU - Paul, Steven

AU - Cooper, Bruce

AU - Skerman, Helen

AU - Alexander, Kimberly

AU - Aouizerat, Bradley

AU - Blackman, Virginia

AU - Merriman, John

AU - Dunn, Laura

AU - Ritchie, Christine

AU - Yates, Patsy

AU - Miaskowski, Christine

PY - 2013/1/3

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N2 - Background: Mortality rates for cancer are decreasing in patients under 60 and increasing in those over 60 years of age. The reasons for these differences in mortality rates remain poorly understood. One explanation may be that older patients received substandard treatment because of concerns about adverse effects. Given the paucity of research on the multiple dimensions of the symptom experience in older oncology patients, the purpose of this study was to evaluate for differences in ratings of symptom occurrence, severity, frequency, and distress between younger (<60 years) and older ( ≥ 60 years) adults undergoing cancer treatment. We hypothesized that older patients would have significantly lower ratings on four symptom dimensions.Methods: Data from two studies in the United States and one study in Australia were combined to conduct this analysis. All three studies used the MSAS to evaluate the occurrence, severity, frequency, and distress of 32 symptoms.Results: Data from 593 oncology outpatients receiving active treatment for their cancer (i.e., 44.4% were <60 years and 55.6% were ≥ 60 years of age) were evaluated. Of the 32 MSAS symptoms, after controlling for significant covariates, older patients reported significantly lower occurrence rates for 15 (46.9%) symptoms, lower severity ratings for 6 (18.9%) symptoms, lower frequency ratings for 4 (12.5%) symptoms, and lower distress ratings for 14 (43.8%) symptoms.Conclusions: This study is the first to evaluate for differences in multiple dimensions of symptom experience in older oncology patients. For almost 50% of the MSAS symptoms, older patients reported significantly lower occurrence rates. While fewer age-related differences were found in ratings of symptom severity, frequency, and distress, a similar pattern was found across all three dimensions. Future research needs to focus on a detailed evaluation of patient and clinical characteristics (i.e., type and dose of treatment) that explain the differences in symptom experience identified in this study.

AB - Background: Mortality rates for cancer are decreasing in patients under 60 and increasing in those over 60 years of age. The reasons for these differences in mortality rates remain poorly understood. One explanation may be that older patients received substandard treatment because of concerns about adverse effects. Given the paucity of research on the multiple dimensions of the symptom experience in older oncology patients, the purpose of this study was to evaluate for differences in ratings of symptom occurrence, severity, frequency, and distress between younger (<60 years) and older ( ≥ 60 years) adults undergoing cancer treatment. We hypothesized that older patients would have significantly lower ratings on four symptom dimensions.Methods: Data from two studies in the United States and one study in Australia were combined to conduct this analysis. All three studies used the MSAS to evaluate the occurrence, severity, frequency, and distress of 32 symptoms.Results: Data from 593 oncology outpatients receiving active treatment for their cancer (i.e., 44.4% were <60 years and 55.6% were ≥ 60 years of age) were evaluated. Of the 32 MSAS symptoms, after controlling for significant covariates, older patients reported significantly lower occurrence rates for 15 (46.9%) symptoms, lower severity ratings for 6 (18.9%) symptoms, lower frequency ratings for 4 (12.5%) symptoms, and lower distress ratings for 14 (43.8%) symptoms.Conclusions: This study is the first to evaluate for differences in multiple dimensions of symptom experience in older oncology patients. For almost 50% of the MSAS symptoms, older patients reported significantly lower occurrence rates. While fewer age-related differences were found in ratings of symptom severity, frequency, and distress, a similar pattern was found across all three dimensions. Future research needs to focus on a detailed evaluation of patient and clinical characteristics (i.e., type and dose of treatment) that explain the differences in symptom experience identified in this study.

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