Differences between dual-method and non-dual-method protection use in a sample of young African American women residing in the Southeastern United States

Jessica M. Sales, Teaniese P. Latham, Ralph DiClemente, Eve Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To characterize dual-method protection users and report the prevalence of dual-method use among young adult African American women residing in the Southeastern United States. Design: Analysis of baseline data from a randomized controlled trial. Setting: A clinic-based sample of young women enrolled in a randomized trial of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-prevention program in Atlanta, Georgia, from June 2005 to June 2007. Participants: African American women aged 14 to 20 years who reported unprotected sexual activity in the past 6 months. Of the eligible adolescents, 94% (N=701) were enrolled in the study and completed baseline assessments. Outcome Measures: Dual-method protection use as well as sociodemographic, individual-level, interpersonal-level, and community-level factors and interpersonal communication skills. Only data from the baseline assessment, before randomization, were used for the analysis. Results: A total of 102 participants (14.6%) were classified as dual-method protection users. After controlling for age and clinic, significant differences between dual-method users and non-dual-method users were found for impulsivity, self-esteem, social support, relationship style, partner communication self-efficacy, and fear of condom negotiation. Conclusions: Dual-method protection use is low. Identification of factors that differentiate dual-method users from non-dual-method users at the individual, interpersonal, and community levels in this young African American sample suggests that HIV, sexually transmitted disease, and unintended pregnancy risk-reduction programs should address factors at each level, not simply the individual level, and that this may involve structural and/or clinical counseling practice changes in clinics that serve young women, to optimally facilitate dual-method protection use among young African American women in the Southeastern United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1125-1131
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume164
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

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Southeastern United States
African Americans
HIV
Impulsive Behavior
Negotiating
Condoms
Self Efficacy
Risk Reduction Behavior
Interpersonal Relations
Random Allocation
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Self Concept
Sexual Behavior
Social Support
Fear
Counseling
Young Adult
Randomized Controlled Trials
Communication
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Differences between dual-method and non-dual-method protection use in a sample of young African American women residing in the Southeastern United States. / Sales, Jessica M.; Latham, Teaniese P.; DiClemente, Ralph; Rose, Eve.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 164, No. 12, 01.12.2010, p. 1125-1131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives: To characterize dual-method protection users and report the prevalence of dual-method use among young adult African American women residing in the Southeastern United States. Design: Analysis of baseline data from a randomized controlled trial. Setting: A clinic-based sample of young women enrolled in a randomized trial of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-prevention program in Atlanta, Georgia, from June 2005 to June 2007. Participants: African American women aged 14 to 20 years who reported unprotected sexual activity in the past 6 months. Of the eligible adolescents, 94{\%} (N=701) were enrolled in the study and completed baseline assessments. Outcome Measures: Dual-method protection use as well as sociodemographic, individual-level, interpersonal-level, and community-level factors and interpersonal communication skills. Only data from the baseline assessment, before randomization, were used for the analysis. Results: A total of 102 participants (14.6{\%}) were classified as dual-method protection users. After controlling for age and clinic, significant differences between dual-method users and non-dual-method users were found for impulsivity, self-esteem, social support, relationship style, partner communication self-efficacy, and fear of condom negotiation. Conclusions: Dual-method protection use is low. Identification of factors that differentiate dual-method users from non-dual-method users at the individual, interpersonal, and community levels in this young African American sample suggests that HIV, sexually transmitted disease, and unintended pregnancy risk-reduction programs should address factors at each level, not simply the individual level, and that this may involve structural and/or clinical counseling practice changes in clinics that serve young women, to optimally facilitate dual-method protection use among young African American women in the Southeastern United States.",
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