Dietary intake of methionine, cysteine, and protein and urinary arsenic excretion In Bangladesh

Julia E. Heck, Jeri W. Nieves, Yu Chen, Faruque Parvez, Paul W. Brandt-Rauf, Joseph H. Graziano, Vesna Slavkovich, Geoffrey R. Howe, Habibul Ahsan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: In Bangladesh, millions of people are exposed to arsenic in drinking water; arsenic is associated with increased risk of cancer. Once ingested, arsenic is metabolized via methylation and excreted in urine. Knowledge about nutritional factors affecting individual variation in methylation is limited. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine associations between intakes of protein, methionine, and cysteine total urinary arsenic in a large population-based sample. Methods: The study subjects were 10,402 disease-free residents of Araihazar, Bangladesh, who participated in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS). Food intakes were assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire developed for the study population. Nutrient composition was determined by using the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine association between total urinary arsenic across quintiles of nutrient intakes while controlling for arsenic exposure from drinking water and other predictors of urinary arsenic. Results: Greater intakes of protein, methionine, and cysteine were associated with 10-15% greater total urinary arsenic excretion, after controlling for total energy intake, body weight, sex, age, tobacco use, and intake of some other nutrients. Conclusions: Given previously reported risks between lower rates of arsenic excretion and increased rates of cancer, these findings support the role of nutrition in preventing arsenic-related disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-104
Number of pages6
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume117
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Bangladesh
Arsenic
Methionine
Cysteine
Proteins
Food
Drinking Water
Methylation
United States Department of Agriculture
Tobacco Use
Energy Intake
Population
Longitudinal Studies
Neoplasms
Eating
Body Weight
Urine
Databases

Keywords

  • Amino acids
  • Arsenic
  • Bangladesh
  • Cysteine
  • Diet
  • Dietary protein
  • Methionine
  • Nutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Heck, J. E., Nieves, J. W., Chen, Y., Parvez, F., Brandt-Rauf, P. W., Graziano, J. H., ... Ahsan, H. (2009). Dietary intake of methionine, cysteine, and protein and urinary arsenic excretion In Bangladesh. Environmental Health Perspectives, 117(1), 99-104. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.11589

Dietary intake of methionine, cysteine, and protein and urinary arsenic excretion In Bangladesh. / Heck, Julia E.; Nieves, Jeri W.; Chen, Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W.; Graziano, Joseph H.; Slavkovich, Vesna; Howe, Geoffrey R.; Ahsan, Habibul.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 117, No. 1, 2009, p. 99-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heck, JE, Nieves, JW, Chen, Y, Parvez, F, Brandt-Rauf, PW, Graziano, JH, Slavkovich, V, Howe, GR & Ahsan, H 2009, 'Dietary intake of methionine, cysteine, and protein and urinary arsenic excretion In Bangladesh', Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 117, no. 1, pp. 99-104. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.11589
Heck, Julia E. ; Nieves, Jeri W. ; Chen, Yu ; Parvez, Faruque ; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W. ; Graziano, Joseph H. ; Slavkovich, Vesna ; Howe, Geoffrey R. ; Ahsan, Habibul. / Dietary intake of methionine, cysteine, and protein and urinary arsenic excretion In Bangladesh. In: Environmental Health Perspectives. 2009 ; Vol. 117, No. 1. pp. 99-104.
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