Dietary intake of fish, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and survival after breast cancer: A population-based follow-up study on Long Island, New York

Nikhil K. Khankari, Patrick T. Bradshaw, Susan E. Steck, Ka He, Andrew F. Olshan, Jing Shen, Jiyoung Ahn, Yu Chen, Habibul Ahsan, Mary Beth Terry, Susan L. Teitelbaum, Alfred I. Neugut, Regina M. Santella, Marilie D. Gammon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND In laboratory experiments, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been found to reduce inflammatory eicosanoids resulting from ω-6 PUFA metabolism via competitive inhibition, and the ω-3-induced cytotoxic environment increases apoptosis and reduces cell growth in breast cancer cells. To the authors' knowledge, epidemiologic investigations regarding whether dietary ω-3 PUFA intake benefits survival after breast cancer are limited and inconsistent. METHODS The authors used resources from a population-based follow-up study conducted on Long Island, New York, among 1463 women newly diagnosed with first primary breast cancer who were interviewed an average of approximately 3 months after diagnosis to assess risk and prognostic factors, including dietary intake (using a food frequency questionnaire). Vital status was determined through 2011, yielding a median follow-up of 14.7 years and 485 deaths. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS All-cause mortality was reduced among women with breast cancer reporting the highest quartile of intake (compared with never) for tuna (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55-0.92), other baked/broiled fish (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58-0.97), and the dietary long-chain ω-3 PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55-0.92) and eicosapentaenoic acid (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58-0.97). CONCLUSIONS All-cause mortality was reduced by 16% to 34% among women with breast cancer who reported a high intake of fish and long-chain ω-3 PUFAs. Long-chain ω-3 PUFA intake from fish and other dietary sources may provide a potential strategy to improve survival after breast cancer. Cancer 2015;121:2244-2252.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2244-2252
Number of pages9
JournalCancer
Volume121
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

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Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Islands
Fishes
Breast Neoplasms
Survival
Confidence Intervals
Population
Tuna
Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Eicosanoids
Mortality
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Apoptosis
Food
Growth
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • all-cause mortality
  • breast cancer
  • polyunsaturated fatty acids PUFAs
  • survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Khankari, N. K., Bradshaw, P. T., Steck, S. E., He, K., Olshan, A. F., Shen, J., ... Gammon, M. D. (2015). Dietary intake of fish, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and survival after breast cancer: A population-based follow-up study on Long Island, New York. Cancer, 121(13), 2244-2252. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.29329

Dietary intake of fish, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and survival after breast cancer : A population-based follow-up study on Long Island, New York. / Khankari, Nikhil K.; Bradshaw, Patrick T.; Steck, Susan E.; He, Ka; Olshan, Andrew F.; Shen, Jing; Ahn, Jiyoung; Chen, Yu; Ahsan, Habibul; Terry, Mary Beth; Teitelbaum, Susan L.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Santella, Regina M.; Gammon, Marilie D.

In: Cancer, Vol. 121, No. 13, 01.07.2015, p. 2244-2252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khankari, NK, Bradshaw, PT, Steck, SE, He, K, Olshan, AF, Shen, J, Ahn, J, Chen, Y, Ahsan, H, Terry, MB, Teitelbaum, SL, Neugut, AI, Santella, RM & Gammon, MD 2015, 'Dietary intake of fish, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and survival after breast cancer: A population-based follow-up study on Long Island, New York', Cancer, vol. 121, no. 13, pp. 2244-2252. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.29329
Khankari, Nikhil K. ; Bradshaw, Patrick T. ; Steck, Susan E. ; He, Ka ; Olshan, Andrew F. ; Shen, Jing ; Ahn, Jiyoung ; Chen, Yu ; Ahsan, Habibul ; Terry, Mary Beth ; Teitelbaum, Susan L. ; Neugut, Alfred I. ; Santella, Regina M. ; Gammon, Marilie D. / Dietary intake of fish, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and survival after breast cancer : A population-based follow-up study on Long Island, New York. In: Cancer. 2015 ; Vol. 121, No. 13. pp. 2244-2252.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND In laboratory experiments, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been found to reduce inflammatory eicosanoids resulting from ω-6 PUFA metabolism via competitive inhibition, and the ω-3-induced cytotoxic environment increases apoptosis and reduces cell growth in breast cancer cells. To the authors' knowledge, epidemiologic investigations regarding whether dietary ω-3 PUFA intake benefits survival after breast cancer are limited and inconsistent. METHODS The authors used resources from a population-based follow-up study conducted on Long Island, New York, among 1463 women newly diagnosed with first primary breast cancer who were interviewed an average of approximately 3 months after diagnosis to assess risk and prognostic factors, including dietary intake (using a food frequency questionnaire). Vital status was determined through 2011, yielding a median follow-up of 14.7 years and 485 deaths. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (95{\%} CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS All-cause mortality was reduced among women with breast cancer reporting the highest quartile of intake (compared with never) for tuna (HR, 0.71; 95{\%} CI, 0.55-0.92), other baked/broiled fish (HR, 0.75; 95{\%} CI, 0.58-0.97), and the dietary long-chain ω-3 PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (HR, 0.71; 95{\%} CI, 0.55-0.92) and eicosapentaenoic acid (HR, 0.75; 95{\%} CI, 0.58-0.97). CONCLUSIONS All-cause mortality was reduced by 16{\%} to 34{\%} among women with breast cancer who reported a high intake of fish and long-chain ω-3 PUFAs. Long-chain ω-3 PUFA intake from fish and other dietary sources may provide a potential strategy to improve survival after breast cancer. Cancer 2015;121:2244-2252.",
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T1 - Dietary intake of fish, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and survival after breast cancer

T2 - A population-based follow-up study on Long Island, New York

AU - Khankari, Nikhil K.

AU - Bradshaw, Patrick T.

AU - Steck, Susan E.

AU - He, Ka

AU - Olshan, Andrew F.

AU - Shen, Jing

AU - Ahn, Jiyoung

AU - Chen, Yu

AU - Ahsan, Habibul

AU - Terry, Mary Beth

AU - Teitelbaum, Susan L.

AU - Neugut, Alfred I.

AU - Santella, Regina M.

AU - Gammon, Marilie D.

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N2 - BACKGROUND In laboratory experiments, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been found to reduce inflammatory eicosanoids resulting from ω-6 PUFA metabolism via competitive inhibition, and the ω-3-induced cytotoxic environment increases apoptosis and reduces cell growth in breast cancer cells. To the authors' knowledge, epidemiologic investigations regarding whether dietary ω-3 PUFA intake benefits survival after breast cancer are limited and inconsistent. METHODS The authors used resources from a population-based follow-up study conducted on Long Island, New York, among 1463 women newly diagnosed with first primary breast cancer who were interviewed an average of approximately 3 months after diagnosis to assess risk and prognostic factors, including dietary intake (using a food frequency questionnaire). Vital status was determined through 2011, yielding a median follow-up of 14.7 years and 485 deaths. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS All-cause mortality was reduced among women with breast cancer reporting the highest quartile of intake (compared with never) for tuna (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55-0.92), other baked/broiled fish (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58-0.97), and the dietary long-chain ω-3 PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55-0.92) and eicosapentaenoic acid (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58-0.97). CONCLUSIONS All-cause mortality was reduced by 16% to 34% among women with breast cancer who reported a high intake of fish and long-chain ω-3 PUFAs. Long-chain ω-3 PUFA intake from fish and other dietary sources may provide a potential strategy to improve survival after breast cancer. Cancer 2015;121:2244-2252.

AB - BACKGROUND In laboratory experiments, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been found to reduce inflammatory eicosanoids resulting from ω-6 PUFA metabolism via competitive inhibition, and the ω-3-induced cytotoxic environment increases apoptosis and reduces cell growth in breast cancer cells. To the authors' knowledge, epidemiologic investigations regarding whether dietary ω-3 PUFA intake benefits survival after breast cancer are limited and inconsistent. METHODS The authors used resources from a population-based follow-up study conducted on Long Island, New York, among 1463 women newly diagnosed with first primary breast cancer who were interviewed an average of approximately 3 months after diagnosis to assess risk and prognostic factors, including dietary intake (using a food frequency questionnaire). Vital status was determined through 2011, yielding a median follow-up of 14.7 years and 485 deaths. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS All-cause mortality was reduced among women with breast cancer reporting the highest quartile of intake (compared with never) for tuna (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55-0.92), other baked/broiled fish (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58-0.97), and the dietary long-chain ω-3 PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.55-0.92) and eicosapentaenoic acid (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58-0.97). CONCLUSIONS All-cause mortality was reduced by 16% to 34% among women with breast cancer who reported a high intake of fish and long-chain ω-3 PUFAs. Long-chain ω-3 PUFA intake from fish and other dietary sources may provide a potential strategy to improve survival after breast cancer. Cancer 2015;121:2244-2252.

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