Dietary B vitamin intake is associated with lower urinary monomethyl arsenic and oxidative stress marker 15-F2t-isoprostane among New Hampshire adults

Caitlin G. Howe, Zhigang Li, Michael S. Zens, Thomas Palys, Yu Chen, Jacqueline Y. Channon, Margaret R. Karagas, Shohreh F. Farzan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Arsenic exposure has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Growing evidence suggests that B vitamins facilitate arsenic metabolism and may protect against arsenic toxicity. However, to our knowledge, few studies have evaluated this in US populations. Objective: Our objective was to examine whether higher B vitamin intake is associated with enhanced arsenic metabolism and lower concentrations of preclinical markers of CVD among New Hampshire adults. Methods: We used weighted quantile sum (WQS) regression to evaluate the collective impact of 6 dietary B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, folate, niacin, and vitamins B-6 and B-12) on 1) the proportion of arsenic metabolites in urine and 2) 6 CVD-related markers [including urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane (15-F2t-IsoP)] among 418 participants (26-75 y of age) from the New Hampshire Health Study. Contributions of arsenic metabolites to B vitamin-CVD marker associations were also explored in structural equation models. Results: In WQS models, the weighted sum of B vitamin intakes from food sources was inversely associated with the proportion of monomethyl arsenic species in urine (uMMA) (β: -1.03; 95% CI: 21.91, 20.15; P = 0.02). Thiamin and vitamins B-6 and B-12 contributed the most to this association, whereas riboflavin had a negligible effect. Higher overall B vitamin intake was also inversely associated with 15-F2t-IsoP (β: -0.21; 95% CI: -0.32, -0.11; P < 0.01), with equal contributions from the 6 B vitamins, which was partially explained by differences in the proportion of uMMA (indirect effect β: -0.01; 95% CI: -0.04, -0.00). Conclusions: Among New Hampshire adults, higher intakes of certain B vitamins (particularly thiamin and vitamins B-6 and B-12 from food sources) may reduce the proportion of uMMA, an intermediate of arsenic metabolism that has been associated with an increased risk of CVD. Higher overall B vitamin intake may also reduce urinary 15-F2t-IsoP, a marker of oxidative stress and potential risk factor for CVD, in part by reducing the proportion of uMMA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2289-2296
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume147
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Vitamin B Complex
Arsenic
Oxidative Stress
Vitamin B 6
Cardiovascular Diseases
Thiamine
Riboflavin
Urine
15-F2t-isoprostane
Niacin
Structural Models
Folic Acid
Eating
Food
Health

Keywords

  • 15-F-isoprostane
  • Arsenic metabolism
  • B vitamins
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • New Hampshire adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Dietary B vitamin intake is associated with lower urinary monomethyl arsenic and oxidative stress marker 15-F2t-isoprostane among New Hampshire adults. / Howe, Caitlin G.; Li, Zhigang; Zens, Michael S.; Palys, Thomas; Chen, Yu; Channon, Jacqueline Y.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Farzan, Shohreh F.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 147, No. 12, 01.12.2017, p. 2289-2296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Howe, Caitlin G. ; Li, Zhigang ; Zens, Michael S. ; Palys, Thomas ; Chen, Yu ; Channon, Jacqueline Y. ; Karagas, Margaret R. ; Farzan, Shohreh F. / Dietary B vitamin intake is associated with lower urinary monomethyl arsenic and oxidative stress marker 15-F2t-isoprostane among New Hampshire adults. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2017 ; Vol. 147, No. 12. pp. 2289-2296.
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abstract = "Background: Arsenic exposure has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Growing evidence suggests that B vitamins facilitate arsenic metabolism and may protect against arsenic toxicity. However, to our knowledge, few studies have evaluated this in US populations. Objective: Our objective was to examine whether higher B vitamin intake is associated with enhanced arsenic metabolism and lower concentrations of preclinical markers of CVD among New Hampshire adults. Methods: We used weighted quantile sum (WQS) regression to evaluate the collective impact of 6 dietary B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, folate, niacin, and vitamins B-6 and B-12) on 1) the proportion of arsenic metabolites in urine and 2) 6 CVD-related markers [including urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane (15-F2t-IsoP)] among 418 participants (26-75 y of age) from the New Hampshire Health Study. Contributions of arsenic metabolites to B vitamin-CVD marker associations were also explored in structural equation models. Results: In WQS models, the weighted sum of B vitamin intakes from food sources was inversely associated with the proportion of monomethyl arsenic species in urine (uMMA) (β: -1.03; 95{\%} CI: 21.91, 20.15; P = 0.02). Thiamin and vitamins B-6 and B-12 contributed the most to this association, whereas riboflavin had a negligible effect. Higher overall B vitamin intake was also inversely associated with 15-F2t-IsoP (β: -0.21; 95{\%} CI: -0.32, -0.11; P < 0.01), with equal contributions from the 6 B vitamins, which was partially explained by differences in the proportion of uMMA (indirect effect β: -0.01; 95{\%} CI: -0.04, -0.00). Conclusions: Among New Hampshire adults, higher intakes of certain B vitamins (particularly thiamin and vitamins B-6 and B-12 from food sources) may reduce the proportion of uMMA, an intermediate of arsenic metabolism that has been associated with an increased risk of CVD. Higher overall B vitamin intake may also reduce urinary 15-F2t-IsoP, a marker of oxidative stress and potential risk factor for CVD, in part by reducing the proportion of uMMA.",
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T1 - Dietary B vitamin intake is associated with lower urinary monomethyl arsenic and oxidative stress marker 15-F2t-isoprostane among New Hampshire adults

AU - Howe, Caitlin G.

AU - Li, Zhigang

AU - Zens, Michael S.

AU - Palys, Thomas

AU - Chen, Yu

AU - Channon, Jacqueline Y.

AU - Karagas, Margaret R.

AU - Farzan, Shohreh F.

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - Background: Arsenic exposure has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Growing evidence suggests that B vitamins facilitate arsenic metabolism and may protect against arsenic toxicity. However, to our knowledge, few studies have evaluated this in US populations. Objective: Our objective was to examine whether higher B vitamin intake is associated with enhanced arsenic metabolism and lower concentrations of preclinical markers of CVD among New Hampshire adults. Methods: We used weighted quantile sum (WQS) regression to evaluate the collective impact of 6 dietary B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, folate, niacin, and vitamins B-6 and B-12) on 1) the proportion of arsenic metabolites in urine and 2) 6 CVD-related markers [including urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane (15-F2t-IsoP)] among 418 participants (26-75 y of age) from the New Hampshire Health Study. Contributions of arsenic metabolites to B vitamin-CVD marker associations were also explored in structural equation models. Results: In WQS models, the weighted sum of B vitamin intakes from food sources was inversely associated with the proportion of monomethyl arsenic species in urine (uMMA) (β: -1.03; 95% CI: 21.91, 20.15; P = 0.02). Thiamin and vitamins B-6 and B-12 contributed the most to this association, whereas riboflavin had a negligible effect. Higher overall B vitamin intake was also inversely associated with 15-F2t-IsoP (β: -0.21; 95% CI: -0.32, -0.11; P < 0.01), with equal contributions from the 6 B vitamins, which was partially explained by differences in the proportion of uMMA (indirect effect β: -0.01; 95% CI: -0.04, -0.00). Conclusions: Among New Hampshire adults, higher intakes of certain B vitamins (particularly thiamin and vitamins B-6 and B-12 from food sources) may reduce the proportion of uMMA, an intermediate of arsenic metabolism that has been associated with an increased risk of CVD. Higher overall B vitamin intake may also reduce urinary 15-F2t-IsoP, a marker of oxidative stress and potential risk factor for CVD, in part by reducing the proportion of uMMA.

AB - Background: Arsenic exposure has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Growing evidence suggests that B vitamins facilitate arsenic metabolism and may protect against arsenic toxicity. However, to our knowledge, few studies have evaluated this in US populations. Objective: Our objective was to examine whether higher B vitamin intake is associated with enhanced arsenic metabolism and lower concentrations of preclinical markers of CVD among New Hampshire adults. Methods: We used weighted quantile sum (WQS) regression to evaluate the collective impact of 6 dietary B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, folate, niacin, and vitamins B-6 and B-12) on 1) the proportion of arsenic metabolites in urine and 2) 6 CVD-related markers [including urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane (15-F2t-IsoP)] among 418 participants (26-75 y of age) from the New Hampshire Health Study. Contributions of arsenic metabolites to B vitamin-CVD marker associations were also explored in structural equation models. Results: In WQS models, the weighted sum of B vitamin intakes from food sources was inversely associated with the proportion of monomethyl arsenic species in urine (uMMA) (β: -1.03; 95% CI: 21.91, 20.15; P = 0.02). Thiamin and vitamins B-6 and B-12 contributed the most to this association, whereas riboflavin had a negligible effect. Higher overall B vitamin intake was also inversely associated with 15-F2t-IsoP (β: -0.21; 95% CI: -0.32, -0.11; P < 0.01), with equal contributions from the 6 B vitamins, which was partially explained by differences in the proportion of uMMA (indirect effect β: -0.01; 95% CI: -0.04, -0.00). Conclusions: Among New Hampshire adults, higher intakes of certain B vitamins (particularly thiamin and vitamins B-6 and B-12 from food sources) may reduce the proportion of uMMA, an intermediate of arsenic metabolism that has been associated with an increased risk of CVD. Higher overall B vitamin intake may also reduce urinary 15-F2t-IsoP, a marker of oxidative stress and potential risk factor for CVD, in part by reducing the proportion of uMMA.

KW - 15-F-isoprostane

KW - Arsenic metabolism

KW - B vitamins

KW - Cardiovascular disease

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