Diesel exhaust exposure among adolescents in Harlem: A community-driven study

Mary Northridge, Joanne Yankura, Patrick L. Kinney, Regina M. Santella, Peggy Shepard, Ynolde Riojas, Maneesha Aggarwal, Paul Strickland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. This study sought individual-level data on diesel exhaust exposure and lung function among adolescents in Harlem as part of a community-driven research agenda. Methods. High school students administered in-person surveys to seventh grade students to ascertain information on demographics, asthma history, and self-reported and maternal smoking. Urine samples were assayed for 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HP), a marker of diesel exhaust exposure, and cotinine, a marker of tobacco smoke exposure. Computer-assisted spirometry was used to measure lung function. Results. Three quarters (76%) of the participating students had detectable levels of 1-HP. Three students (13%) had an FEF25-75 of less than or equal to 80% of their predicted measurements, and 4 students (17%) had results between 80% and 90% of the predicted value, all of which are suggestive of possible lung impairment. Conclusions. These data suggest that most adolescents in Harlem are exposed to detectable levels of diesel exhaust, a known exacerbator and possible cause of chronic lung disorders such as asthma. Community-driven research initiatives are important for empowering communities to make needed changes to improve their environments and health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)998-1002
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume89
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1999

Fingerprint

Vehicle Emissions
Students
Lung
Asthma
Cotinine
Spirometry
Research
Smoke
Tobacco
Smoking
Mothers
Demography
Urine
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Northridge, M., Yankura, J., Kinney, P. L., Santella, R. M., Shepard, P., Riojas, Y., ... Strickland, P. (1999). Diesel exhaust exposure among adolescents in Harlem: A community-driven study. American Journal of Public Health, 89(7), 998-1002.

Diesel exhaust exposure among adolescents in Harlem : A community-driven study. / Northridge, Mary; Yankura, Joanne; Kinney, Patrick L.; Santella, Regina M.; Shepard, Peggy; Riojas, Ynolde; Aggarwal, Maneesha; Strickland, Paul.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 89, No. 7, 07.1999, p. 998-1002.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Northridge, M, Yankura, J, Kinney, PL, Santella, RM, Shepard, P, Riojas, Y, Aggarwal, M & Strickland, P 1999, 'Diesel exhaust exposure among adolescents in Harlem: A community-driven study', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 89, no. 7, pp. 998-1002.
Northridge M, Yankura J, Kinney PL, Santella RM, Shepard P, Riojas Y et al. Diesel exhaust exposure among adolescents in Harlem: A community-driven study. American Journal of Public Health. 1999 Jul;89(7):998-1002.
Northridge, Mary ; Yankura, Joanne ; Kinney, Patrick L. ; Santella, Regina M. ; Shepard, Peggy ; Riojas, Ynolde ; Aggarwal, Maneesha ; Strickland, Paul. / Diesel exhaust exposure among adolescents in Harlem : A community-driven study. In: American Journal of Public Health. 1999 ; Vol. 89, No. 7. pp. 998-1002.
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