Did expanding medicaid affect welfare participation?

John Ham, Lara D. Shore-Sheppard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In a widely cited 1995 paper, Aaron Yelowitz concluded that Medicaid eligibility expansions for children were associated with increased labor force participation and reduced welfare participation among single mothers. The authors of the present study, using data from the 1988-96 Current Population Surveys, re-examine the evidence presented by Yelowitz. They find that Yelowitz's results resulted from two factors: he imposed a restriction on the parameter estimates not predicted by theory and rejected in the data, and he used only one of two income tests that families must pass to be eligible for welfare. The authors conclude that there is no evidence detectable in the CPS data of a relationship between welfare or labor force participation and the Medicaid income limits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)452-470
Number of pages19
JournalIndustrial and Labor Relations Review
Volume58
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

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Personnel
Medicaid
Participation
Income
Labor force participation
Single mothers
Current population survey
Factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

Did expanding medicaid affect welfare participation? / Ham, John; Shore-Sheppard, Lara D.

In: Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Vol. 58, No. 3, 01.01.2005, p. 452-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ham, John ; Shore-Sheppard, Lara D. / Did expanding medicaid affect welfare participation?. In: Industrial and Labor Relations Review. 2005 ; Vol. 58, No. 3. pp. 452-470.
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