Developments in intellectual property and traditional knowledge protection

Jane Anderson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    In order to protect indigenous/traditional knowledge, intellectual property law must be leveraged in a way that is responsive to the dynamic inter-relationships between law, society and culture. Over the last decade, increased attention to Indigenous concerns has produced a wealth of literature and prompted recognition of the diverse needs of Indigenous peoples in relation to law, legal access and knowledge protection. There is much more that needs to be done, especially in closely considering what the consequences of legal protection are for the ways in which traditional/indigenous culture is understood and experienced by Indigenous communities and others. This paper considers the latest developments within this field and discusses what possibilities for further legal action exist within both international and local contexts.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)354-365
    Number of pages12
    JournalAustralian Journal of Adult Learning
    Volume49
    Issue number2
    StatePublished - Jul 2009

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    intellectual property
    Law
    legal protection
    community

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Education

    Cite this

    Developments in intellectual property and traditional knowledge protection. / Anderson, Jane.

    In: Australian Journal of Adult Learning, Vol. 49, No. 2, 07.2009, p. 354-365.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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