Developing low-income children's vocabulary and content knowledge through a shared book reading program

Susan Neuman, Tanya Kaefer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examines the effects of a shared book intervention designed to improve low-income children's oral language vocabulary and content knowledge in science. Classrooms (preK-through grade 1) from 12 elementary schools in a large metropolitan area were randomly selected into treatment (N = 36) and control groups (N = 34). The year-long intervention involved children in read aloud books about science topics, using cross-cutting concepts and vocabulary within taxonomic categories to build knowledge networks. Pre- and post-tests examined child outcomes in vocabulary, science concepts, language, and knowledge of the information genre. Results indicated that pre-K and kindergartners’ learned significantly more words and science concepts than controls. Growth for ELL students exceeded that of native English speakers. Standardized scores in language, however, remained largely flat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-24
Number of pages10
JournalContemporary Educational Psychology
Volume52
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Vocabulary
Reading
vocabulary
low income
science
Language
language
Child Language
elementary school
agglomeration area
genre
school grade
Students
classroom
Control Groups
Growth
knowledge
Group
student
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Developing low-income children's vocabulary and content knowledge through a shared book reading program. / Neuman, Susan; Kaefer, Tanya.

In: Contemporary Educational Psychology, Vol. 52, 01.01.2018, p. 15-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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