Developing a neurobehavioral animal model of poverty: Drawing cross-species connections between environments of scarcity-adversity, parenting quality, and infant outcome

Family Life Project Key Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Children reared in impoverished environments are at risk for enduring psychological and physical health problems. Mechanisms by which poverty affects development, however, remain unclear. To explore one potential mechanism of poverty's impact on social–emotional and cognitive development, an experimental examination of a rodent model of scarcity-adversity was conducted and compared to results from a longitudinal study of human infants and families followed from birth (N = 1,292) who faced high levels of poverty-related scarcity-adversity. Cross-species results supported the hypothesis that altered caregiving is one pathway by which poverty adversely impacts development. Rodent mothers assigned to the scarcity-adversity condition exhibited decreased sensitive parenting and increased negative parenting relative to mothers assigned to the control condition. Furthermore, scarcity-adversity reared pups exhibited decreased developmental competence as indicated by disrupted nipple attachment, distress vocalization when in physical contact with an anesthetized mother, and reduced preference for maternal odor with corresponding changes in brain activation. Human results indicated that scarcity-adversity was inversely correlated with sensitive parenting and positively correlated with negative parenting, and that parenting fully mediated the association of poverty-related risk with infant indicators of developmental competence. Findings are discussed from the perspective of the usefulness of bidirectional–translational research to inform interventions for at-risk families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 2 2018

Fingerprint

Parenting
Poverty
Animal Models
Mothers
Mental Competency
Rodentia
Nipples
Longitudinal Studies
Parturition
Psychology
Health
Brain
Research

Keywords

  • brain
  • development
  • parenting
  • poverty
  • regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{c93dd88807564bea9813de802067d103,
title = "Developing a neurobehavioral animal model of poverty: Drawing cross-species connections between environments of scarcity-adversity, parenting quality, and infant outcome",
abstract = "Children reared in impoverished environments are at risk for enduring psychological and physical health problems. Mechanisms by which poverty affects development, however, remain unclear. To explore one potential mechanism of poverty's impact on social–emotional and cognitive development, an experimental examination of a rodent model of scarcity-adversity was conducted and compared to results from a longitudinal study of human infants and families followed from birth (N = 1,292) who faced high levels of poverty-related scarcity-adversity. Cross-species results supported the hypothesis that altered caregiving is one pathway by which poverty adversely impacts development. Rodent mothers assigned to the scarcity-adversity condition exhibited decreased sensitive parenting and increased negative parenting relative to mothers assigned to the control condition. Furthermore, scarcity-adversity reared pups exhibited decreased developmental competence as indicated by disrupted nipple attachment, distress vocalization when in physical contact with an anesthetized mother, and reduced preference for maternal odor with corresponding changes in brain activation. Human results indicated that scarcity-adversity was inversely correlated with sensitive parenting and positively correlated with negative parenting, and that parenting fully mediated the association of poverty-related risk with infant indicators of developmental competence. Findings are discussed from the perspective of the usefulness of bidirectional–translational research to inform interventions for at-risk families.",
keywords = "brain, development, parenting, poverty, regulation",
author = "{Family Life Project Key Investigators} and Perry, {Rosemarie E.} and Finegood, {Eric D.} and Braren, {Stephen H.} and Dejoseph, {Meriah L.} and Putrino, {David F.} and Wilson, {Donald A.} and Sullivan, {Regina M.} and Raver, {C. Cybele} and Clancy Blair",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1017/S095457941800007X",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--20",
journal = "Development and Psychopathology",
issn = "0954-5794",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Developing a neurobehavioral animal model of poverty

T2 - Drawing cross-species connections between environments of scarcity-adversity, parenting quality, and infant outcome

AU - Family Life Project Key Investigators

AU - Perry, Rosemarie E.

AU - Finegood, Eric D.

AU - Braren, Stephen H.

AU - Dejoseph, Meriah L.

AU - Putrino, David F.

AU - Wilson, Donald A.

AU - Sullivan, Regina M.

AU - Raver, C. Cybele

AU - Blair, Clancy

PY - 2018/4/2

Y1 - 2018/4/2

N2 - Children reared in impoverished environments are at risk for enduring psychological and physical health problems. Mechanisms by which poverty affects development, however, remain unclear. To explore one potential mechanism of poverty's impact on social–emotional and cognitive development, an experimental examination of a rodent model of scarcity-adversity was conducted and compared to results from a longitudinal study of human infants and families followed from birth (N = 1,292) who faced high levels of poverty-related scarcity-adversity. Cross-species results supported the hypothesis that altered caregiving is one pathway by which poverty adversely impacts development. Rodent mothers assigned to the scarcity-adversity condition exhibited decreased sensitive parenting and increased negative parenting relative to mothers assigned to the control condition. Furthermore, scarcity-adversity reared pups exhibited decreased developmental competence as indicated by disrupted nipple attachment, distress vocalization when in physical contact with an anesthetized mother, and reduced preference for maternal odor with corresponding changes in brain activation. Human results indicated that scarcity-adversity was inversely correlated with sensitive parenting and positively correlated with negative parenting, and that parenting fully mediated the association of poverty-related risk with infant indicators of developmental competence. Findings are discussed from the perspective of the usefulness of bidirectional–translational research to inform interventions for at-risk families.

AB - Children reared in impoverished environments are at risk for enduring psychological and physical health problems. Mechanisms by which poverty affects development, however, remain unclear. To explore one potential mechanism of poverty's impact on social–emotional and cognitive development, an experimental examination of a rodent model of scarcity-adversity was conducted and compared to results from a longitudinal study of human infants and families followed from birth (N = 1,292) who faced high levels of poverty-related scarcity-adversity. Cross-species results supported the hypothesis that altered caregiving is one pathway by which poverty adversely impacts development. Rodent mothers assigned to the scarcity-adversity condition exhibited decreased sensitive parenting and increased negative parenting relative to mothers assigned to the control condition. Furthermore, scarcity-adversity reared pups exhibited decreased developmental competence as indicated by disrupted nipple attachment, distress vocalization when in physical contact with an anesthetized mother, and reduced preference for maternal odor with corresponding changes in brain activation. Human results indicated that scarcity-adversity was inversely correlated with sensitive parenting and positively correlated with negative parenting, and that parenting fully mediated the association of poverty-related risk with infant indicators of developmental competence. Findings are discussed from the perspective of the usefulness of bidirectional–translational research to inform interventions for at-risk families.

KW - brain

KW - development

KW - parenting

KW - poverty

KW - regulation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044640880&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85044640880&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S095457941800007X

DO - 10.1017/S095457941800007X

M3 - Article

C2 - 29606185

AN - SCOPUS:85044640880

SP - 1

EP - 20

JO - Development and Psychopathology

JF - Development and Psychopathology

SN - 0954-5794

ER -