Detection of biological molecules: From self-assembled films to self-integrated devices

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Biological molecules are often detected from an analyte mixture by selective binding to a solid support. The function of the sensor is then to detect such surface binding events, to convert them to an electrical signal, and to extract information from the signal. These functions, although simple in principle pose a number of challenges. Nevertheless, research progress has made it possible to formulate approximate guidelines for the chemical modification of sensor surfaces so as to optimize device performance. An overview is given of methods used to derivatize surfaces with biological probes on silica-like and metal supports.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE International Conference on Computer Design: VLSI in Computers and Processors
Pages112-113
Number of pages2
StatePublished - 2003
EventProceedings: 21st International Conference on Computer Design ICCD 2003 - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Oct 13 2003Oct 15 2003

Other

OtherProceedings: 21st International Conference on Computer Design ICCD 2003
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period10/13/0310/15/03

Fingerprint

Molecules
Sensors
Chemical modification
Silica
Metals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Levicky, R. (2003). Detection of biological molecules: From self-assembled films to self-integrated devices. In Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Computer Design: VLSI in Computers and Processors (pp. 112-113)

Detection of biological molecules : From self-assembled films to self-integrated devices. / Levicky, Rastislav.

Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Computer Design: VLSI in Computers and Processors. 2003. p. 112-113.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Levicky, R 2003, Detection of biological molecules: From self-assembled films to self-integrated devices. in Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Computer Design: VLSI in Computers and Processors. pp. 112-113, Proceedings: 21st International Conference on Computer Design ICCD 2003, San Jose, CA, United States, 10/13/03.
Levicky R. Detection of biological molecules: From self-assembled films to self-integrated devices. In Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Computer Design: VLSI in Computers and Processors. 2003. p. 112-113
Levicky, Rastislav. / Detection of biological molecules : From self-assembled films to self-integrated devices. Proceedings - IEEE International Conference on Computer Design: VLSI in Computers and Processors. 2003. pp. 112-113
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