Deleterious Effects of Higher Body Mass Index on Subjective and Objective Measures of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Cancer Survivors

Iva Petrovchich, Kord M. Kober, Laura Wagner, Steven M. Paul, Gary Abrams, Margaret A. Chesney, Kimberly Topp, Betty Smoot, Mark Schumacher, Yvette P. Conley, Marilyn Hammer, Jon D. Levine, Christine Miaskowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context: Recent, albeit, limited evidence suggests that body mass index (BMI) may be a modifiable risk factor to reduce the deleterious effects of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in cancer survivors. Objectives: To evaluate for differences in demographic, clinical, pain, sensation, and balance characteristics among three BMI groups. We hypothesized that as BMI increased, survivors would report higher pain intensity scores and have significant decrements in measures of sensation and balance. Methods: A total of 416 survivors with CIPN were evaluated using subjective and objective measures of CIPN. Survivors were divided into three BMI groups (i.e., normal weight, overweight, and obese). Differences among the BMI groups were evaluated using parametric and nonparametric statistics. Results: Of the 416 survivors, 45.4% were normal weight, 32.5% were overweight, and 22.1% were obese. Compared with the normal-weight group, survivors in the other two groups had lower functional status scores, a higher comorbidity burden, higher pain intensity scores, and higher interference scores. In addition, compared with the normal-weight group, survivors in the other two BMI groups had significantly worse balance scores. Conclusion: Our findings support the hypothesis that as BMI increased, pain sensation and balance characteristics worsened. Our findings suggest that nutritional counseling as well as exercise and weight management programs in survivors with CIPN may improve these clinically important problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Survivors
Body Mass Index
Drug Therapy
Neoplasms
Weights and Measures
Pain
Nonparametric Statistics
Comorbidity
Counseling
Demography
Exercise

Keywords

  • balance
  • body mass index
  • cancer survivor
  • Chemotherapy
  • peripheral neuropathy
  • platinum
  • taxane

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Deleterious Effects of Higher Body Mass Index on Subjective and Objective Measures of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Cancer Survivors. / Petrovchich, Iva; Kober, Kord M.; Wagner, Laura; Paul, Steven M.; Abrams, Gary; Chesney, Margaret A.; Topp, Kimberly; Smoot, Betty; Schumacher, Mark; Conley, Yvette P.; Hammer, Marilyn; Levine, Jon D.; Miaskowski, Christine.

In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Petrovchich, Iva ; Kober, Kord M. ; Wagner, Laura ; Paul, Steven M. ; Abrams, Gary ; Chesney, Margaret A. ; Topp, Kimberly ; Smoot, Betty ; Schumacher, Mark ; Conley, Yvette P. ; Hammer, Marilyn ; Levine, Jon D. ; Miaskowski, Christine. / Deleterious Effects of Higher Body Mass Index on Subjective and Objective Measures of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Cancer Survivors. In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 2019.
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abstract = "Context: Recent, albeit, limited evidence suggests that body mass index (BMI) may be a modifiable risk factor to reduce the deleterious effects of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in cancer survivors. Objectives: To evaluate for differences in demographic, clinical, pain, sensation, and balance characteristics among three BMI groups. We hypothesized that as BMI increased, survivors would report higher pain intensity scores and have significant decrements in measures of sensation and balance. Methods: A total of 416 survivors with CIPN were evaluated using subjective and objective measures of CIPN. Survivors were divided into three BMI groups (i.e., normal weight, overweight, and obese). Differences among the BMI groups were evaluated using parametric and nonparametric statistics. Results: Of the 416 survivors, 45.4{\%} were normal weight, 32.5{\%} were overweight, and 22.1{\%} were obese. Compared with the normal-weight group, survivors in the other two groups had lower functional status scores, a higher comorbidity burden, higher pain intensity scores, and higher interference scores. In addition, compared with the normal-weight group, survivors in the other two BMI groups had significantly worse balance scores. Conclusion: Our findings support the hypothesis that as BMI increased, pain sensation and balance characteristics worsened. Our findings suggest that nutritional counseling as well as exercise and weight management programs in survivors with CIPN may improve these clinically important problems.",
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AU - Petrovchich, Iva

AU - Kober, Kord M.

AU - Wagner, Laura

AU - Paul, Steven M.

AU - Abrams, Gary

AU - Chesney, Margaret A.

AU - Topp, Kimberly

AU - Smoot, Betty

AU - Schumacher, Mark

AU - Conley, Yvette P.

AU - Hammer, Marilyn

AU - Levine, Jon D.

AU - Miaskowski, Christine

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N2 - Context: Recent, albeit, limited evidence suggests that body mass index (BMI) may be a modifiable risk factor to reduce the deleterious effects of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in cancer survivors. Objectives: To evaluate for differences in demographic, clinical, pain, sensation, and balance characteristics among three BMI groups. We hypothesized that as BMI increased, survivors would report higher pain intensity scores and have significant decrements in measures of sensation and balance. Methods: A total of 416 survivors with CIPN were evaluated using subjective and objective measures of CIPN. Survivors were divided into three BMI groups (i.e., normal weight, overweight, and obese). Differences among the BMI groups were evaluated using parametric and nonparametric statistics. Results: Of the 416 survivors, 45.4% were normal weight, 32.5% were overweight, and 22.1% were obese. Compared with the normal-weight group, survivors in the other two groups had lower functional status scores, a higher comorbidity burden, higher pain intensity scores, and higher interference scores. In addition, compared with the normal-weight group, survivors in the other two BMI groups had significantly worse balance scores. Conclusion: Our findings support the hypothesis that as BMI increased, pain sensation and balance characteristics worsened. Our findings suggest that nutritional counseling as well as exercise and weight management programs in survivors with CIPN may improve these clinically important problems.

AB - Context: Recent, albeit, limited evidence suggests that body mass index (BMI) may be a modifiable risk factor to reduce the deleterious effects of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in cancer survivors. Objectives: To evaluate for differences in demographic, clinical, pain, sensation, and balance characteristics among three BMI groups. We hypothesized that as BMI increased, survivors would report higher pain intensity scores and have significant decrements in measures of sensation and balance. Methods: A total of 416 survivors with CIPN were evaluated using subjective and objective measures of CIPN. Survivors were divided into three BMI groups (i.e., normal weight, overweight, and obese). Differences among the BMI groups were evaluated using parametric and nonparametric statistics. Results: Of the 416 survivors, 45.4% were normal weight, 32.5% were overweight, and 22.1% were obese. Compared with the normal-weight group, survivors in the other two groups had lower functional status scores, a higher comorbidity burden, higher pain intensity scores, and higher interference scores. In addition, compared with the normal-weight group, survivors in the other two BMI groups had significantly worse balance scores. Conclusion: Our findings support the hypothesis that as BMI increased, pain sensation and balance characteristics worsened. Our findings suggest that nutritional counseling as well as exercise and weight management programs in survivors with CIPN may improve these clinically important problems.

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