Decreased physical function in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

Michael L. Miller, Angela M. Kress, Carolyn Berry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. To assess the extent of physical disability in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), classified according to subtype, and whether synovitis or flexion contractures are present on examination. Methods. This retrospective study included 88 JRA patients and 50 controls without musculoskeletal disease. The outcome measure was the disability index (DI) derived from the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ). Results. DI scores for JRA patients with synovitis (mean 0.49, range 0-1.88) and without synovitis (mean 0.37, range 0-1.75) were significantly higher (P < 0.001 for both groups) than for controls (mean 0.06, range 0-0.75, P < 0.001), but not significantly different from one another. Similarly, DI scores for JRA patients with and without any flexion contractures were higher than for controls, but not significantly different from one another. DI scores for JRA patients with both synovitis and flexion contractures were significantly higher than DI scores for JRA patients with neither, but were not distinguishable from JRA patients with synovitis only or flexion contractures only. Likewise, DI scores for JRA patients lacking synovitis and flexion contractures were not significantly different than those for JRA patients with one or the other. DI scores for systemic and polyarticular patients were higher than for pauciarticular patients, and DI scores for all 3 subtypes were higher than for controls. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that many JRA patients, including those with pauciarticular JRA, have problems with physical function, even when synovitis and flexion contractures are not present. Further attention and research is needed to elucidate the causes or origins of disability in JRA patients with seemingly well- controlled disease. We recommend that health status instruments like the CHAQ be more widely used for JRA patients to complement other assessments, especially in planning occupational and physical therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)309-313
Number of pages5
JournalArthritis Care and Research
Volume12
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 1999

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Juvenile Arthritis
Synovitis
Contracture
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Occupational Therapy
Health
Health Status
Retrospective Studies

Keywords

  • Disability
  • Health status
  • Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis
  • Physical function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Decreased physical function in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. / Miller, Michael L.; Kress, Angela M.; Berry, Carolyn.

In: Arthritis Care and Research, Vol. 12, No. 5, 10.1999, p. 309-313.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, Michael L. ; Kress, Angela M. ; Berry, Carolyn. / Decreased physical function in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. In: Arthritis Care and Research. 1999 ; Vol. 12, No. 5. pp. 309-313.
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