Decoupled choice-driven and stimulus-related activity in parietal neurons may be misrepresented by choice probabilities

Adam Zaidel, Gregory C. Deangelis, Dora Angelaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Trial-by-trial correlations between neural responses and choices (choice probabilities) are often interpreted to reflect a causal contribution of neurons to task performance. However, choice probabilities may arise from top-down, rather than bottom-up, signals. We isolated distinct sensory and decision contributions to single-unit activity recorded from the dorsal medial superior temporal (MSTd) and ventral intraparietal (VIP) areas of monkeys during perception of self-motion. Superficially, neurons in both areas show similar tuning curves during task performance. However, tuning in MSTd neurons primarily reflects sensory inputs, whereas choice-related signals dominate tuning in VIP neurons. Importantly, the choice-related activity of VIP neurons is not predictable from their stimulus tuning, and these factors are often confounded in choice probability measurements. This finding was confirmed in a subset of neurons for which stimulus tuning was measured during passive fixation. Our findings reveal decoupled stimulus and choice signals in the VIP area, and challenge our understanding of choice signals in the brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number715
JournalNature Communications
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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neurons
stimuli
Neurons
Tuning
tuning
Task Performance and Analysis
Motion Perception
monkeys
Haplorhini
Brain
set theory
brain
curves

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Decoupled choice-driven and stimulus-related activity in parietal neurons may be misrepresented by choice probabilities. / Zaidel, Adam; Deangelis, Gregory C.; Angelaki, Dora.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 8, No. 1, 715, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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