Decisiveness, peace, and inequality in games of conflict

Juan A. Lacomba, Francisco Lagos, Ernesto Reuben, Frans van Winden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this paper, we study two games of conflict characterized by unequal access to productive resources and finitely repeated interaction. In the Noisy Conflict game, the winner of the conflict is randomly determined depending on a players’ relative conflict expenditures. In the Decisive Conflict game, the winner of the conflict is simply the player who spends more on conflict. By comparing behavior in the two games, we evaluate the effect that “decisiveness” has on the allocation of productive resources to conflict, the resulting inequality in the players’ final wealth, and the likelihood that players form long-lasting peaceful relations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)216-229
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Economic Psychology
Volume63
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Resource Allocation
Health Expenditures
peace
Peace
Decisiveness
resources
expenditures
interaction

Keywords

  • Conflict
  • Decisiveness
  • Inequality
  • Peace
  • Rent seeking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Applied Psychology
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Decisiveness, peace, and inequality in games of conflict. / Lacomba, Juan A.; Lagos, Francisco; Reuben, Ernesto; van Winden, Frans.

In: Journal of Economic Psychology, Vol. 63, 01.12.2017, p. 216-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lacomba, Juan A. ; Lagos, Francisco ; Reuben, Ernesto ; van Winden, Frans. / Decisiveness, peace, and inequality in games of conflict. In: Journal of Economic Psychology. 2017 ; Vol. 63. pp. 216-229.
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