Debriefing approaches for high-fidelity simulations and outcomes related to clinical judgment in baccalaureate nursing students

Patrick Lavoie, Jacinthe Pepin, Sylvie Cossette, Sean Clarke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Simulation followed by debriefing is increasingly common in clinical nursing education. Yet, limited studies have compared approaches to debriefing—the portion of simulations where participants re-examine and make sense of their experience. In this study, 120 baccalaureate nursing students in Quebec were randomized to receive one of two types of debriefing (self-assessment with Plus-Delta vs. guided reflection using a structured tool with REsPoND) after each of four simulations (a hemorrhage scenario, two sepsis scenarios, and a trauma simulation) during which their situation awareness was measured as a proxy for their clinical judgment. Unexpectedly, situation awareness scores showed little to no consistency across students or simulations and no clear improvements over time were noted, which rendered the comparison of the debriefing approaches across scenarios problematic. However, when comparing the two iterations of the sepsis scenario, students who participated in a reflective debriefing showed greater improvement in their recognition of abnormalities in patient vital signs and level of consciousness than students whose debriefing involved self-assessment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCollegian
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Nursing Students
Students
Sepsis
Vital Signs
Quebec
Nursing Education
Proxy
Consciousness
Hemorrhage
Wounds and Injuries
Self-Assessment

Keywords

  • Clinical judgment
  • Debriefing
  • Patient deterioration
  • Reflection
  • Simulation
  • Situation awareness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Debriefing approaches for high-fidelity simulations and outcomes related to clinical judgment in baccalaureate nursing students. / Lavoie, Patrick; Pepin, Jacinthe; Cossette, Sylvie; Clarke, Sean.

In: Collegian, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3b5194b8860e44c29f2f643bc15d73ff,
title = "Debriefing approaches for high-fidelity simulations and outcomes related to clinical judgment in baccalaureate nursing students",
abstract = "Simulation followed by debriefing is increasingly common in clinical nursing education. Yet, limited studies have compared approaches to debriefing—the portion of simulations where participants re-examine and make sense of their experience. In this study, 120 baccalaureate nursing students in Quebec were randomized to receive one of two types of debriefing (self-assessment with Plus-Delta vs. guided reflection using a structured tool with REsPoND) after each of four simulations (a hemorrhage scenario, two sepsis scenarios, and a trauma simulation) during which their situation awareness was measured as a proxy for their clinical judgment. Unexpectedly, situation awareness scores showed little to no consistency across students or simulations and no clear improvements over time were noted, which rendered the comparison of the debriefing approaches across scenarios problematic. However, when comparing the two iterations of the sepsis scenario, students who participated in a reflective debriefing showed greater improvement in their recognition of abnormalities in patient vital signs and level of consciousness than students whose debriefing involved self-assessment.",
keywords = "Clinical judgment, Debriefing, Patient deterioration, Reflection, Simulation, Situation awareness",
author = "Patrick Lavoie and Jacinthe Pepin and Sylvie Cossette and Sean Clarke",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.colegn.2019.01.001",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Collegian",
issn = "1322-7696",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Debriefing approaches for high-fidelity simulations and outcomes related to clinical judgment in baccalaureate nursing students

AU - Lavoie, Patrick

AU - Pepin, Jacinthe

AU - Cossette, Sylvie

AU - Clarke, Sean

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Simulation followed by debriefing is increasingly common in clinical nursing education. Yet, limited studies have compared approaches to debriefing—the portion of simulations where participants re-examine and make sense of their experience. In this study, 120 baccalaureate nursing students in Quebec were randomized to receive one of two types of debriefing (self-assessment with Plus-Delta vs. guided reflection using a structured tool with REsPoND) after each of four simulations (a hemorrhage scenario, two sepsis scenarios, and a trauma simulation) during which their situation awareness was measured as a proxy for their clinical judgment. Unexpectedly, situation awareness scores showed little to no consistency across students or simulations and no clear improvements over time were noted, which rendered the comparison of the debriefing approaches across scenarios problematic. However, when comparing the two iterations of the sepsis scenario, students who participated in a reflective debriefing showed greater improvement in their recognition of abnormalities in patient vital signs and level of consciousness than students whose debriefing involved self-assessment.

AB - Simulation followed by debriefing is increasingly common in clinical nursing education. Yet, limited studies have compared approaches to debriefing—the portion of simulations where participants re-examine and make sense of their experience. In this study, 120 baccalaureate nursing students in Quebec were randomized to receive one of two types of debriefing (self-assessment with Plus-Delta vs. guided reflection using a structured tool with REsPoND) after each of four simulations (a hemorrhage scenario, two sepsis scenarios, and a trauma simulation) during which their situation awareness was measured as a proxy for their clinical judgment. Unexpectedly, situation awareness scores showed little to no consistency across students or simulations and no clear improvements over time were noted, which rendered the comparison of the debriefing approaches across scenarios problematic. However, when comparing the two iterations of the sepsis scenario, students who participated in a reflective debriefing showed greater improvement in their recognition of abnormalities in patient vital signs and level of consciousness than students whose debriefing involved self-assessment.

KW - Clinical judgment

KW - Debriefing

KW - Patient deterioration

KW - Reflection

KW - Simulation

KW - Situation awareness

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85059909896&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85059909896&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.colegn.2019.01.001

DO - 10.1016/j.colegn.2019.01.001

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85059909896

JO - Collegian

JF - Collegian

SN - 1322-7696

ER -