Daylight, biochrome surfaces, and human chromatic response in the Fourier domain

Valérie Bonnardel, Laurence T. Maloney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We first report Fourier analyses of a collection of 348 daylight spectral power distributions and 1695 biochrome surface reflectance functions. The power spectra of the daylights are low pass with more than 99% of spectral power below 1 cycle/300 nm and 99.9% below 3 cycles/300 nm. The power spectra of reflectance functions are also low pass with more than 99% of spectral power below 4 cycles/300 nm and 99.9% below 11 cycles/300 nm. Consequently, the resulting color signals are typically low pass with, for our samples, an estimated frequency cutoff of 5 cycles/300 nm. Theoretical and experimental data concerning human chromatic response in the frequency domain show that this limit corresponds to the highest frequency that the color system can resolve. The implications for normal and abnormal human color vision are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)677-686
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science, and Vision
Volume17
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2000

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Power spectrum
Color
Color vision
Cutoff frequency
Color Vision
Fourier Analysis
Power (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition

Cite this

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abstract = "We first report Fourier analyses of a collection of 348 daylight spectral power distributions and 1695 biochrome surface reflectance functions. The power spectra of the daylights are low pass with more than 99{\%} of spectral power below 1 cycle/300 nm and 99.9{\%} below 3 cycles/300 nm. The power spectra of reflectance functions are also low pass with more than 99{\%} of spectral power below 4 cycles/300 nm and 99.9{\%} below 11 cycles/300 nm. Consequently, the resulting color signals are typically low pass with, for our samples, an estimated frequency cutoff of 5 cycles/300 nm. Theoretical and experimental data concerning human chromatic response in the frequency domain show that this limit corresponds to the highest frequency that the color system can resolve. The implications for normal and abnormal human color vision are discussed.",
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AU - Maloney, Laurence T.

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AB - We first report Fourier analyses of a collection of 348 daylight spectral power distributions and 1695 biochrome surface reflectance functions. The power spectra of the daylights are low pass with more than 99% of spectral power below 1 cycle/300 nm and 99.9% below 3 cycles/300 nm. The power spectra of reflectance functions are also low pass with more than 99% of spectral power below 4 cycles/300 nm and 99.9% below 11 cycles/300 nm. Consequently, the resulting color signals are typically low pass with, for our samples, an estimated frequency cutoff of 5 cycles/300 nm. Theoretical and experimental data concerning human chromatic response in the frequency domain show that this limit corresponds to the highest frequency that the color system can resolve. The implications for normal and abnormal human color vision are discussed.

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