Current status and future prospects of array-based comparative genomic hybridisation

Antoine M. Snijders, Daniel Pinkel, Donna Albertson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The majority of human cancers as well as many developmental abnormalities harbour chromosomal imbalances, many of which result in the gain and/or loss of genomic material. Conventional comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) has been used extensively to map DNA copy number changes to chromosomal positions. The introduction of microarray CGH provided a powerful tool to precisely detect and quantify genomic aberrations and map these directly onto the sequence of the human genome. In the past several years, a number of different approaches towards array-based CGH have been undertaken. This paper reviews these approaches and presents some of the recently-developed applications of this new technology in both research and clinical settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-45
Number of pages9
JournalBriefings in Functional Genomics and Proteomics
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2003

Fingerprint

Comparative Genomic Hybridization
Microarrays
Ports and harbors
Aberrations
DNA Copy Number Variations
Genes
Human Genome
Chromosome Aberrations
DNA
Technology
Research
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Array CGH
  • Cancer
  • Chromosomal imbalance
  • Comparative genomic hybridisation
  • Developmental abnormality
  • DNA copy number
  • Microarray

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Current status and future prospects of array-based comparative genomic hybridisation. / Snijders, Antoine M.; Pinkel, Daniel; Albertson, Donna.

In: Briefings in Functional Genomics and Proteomics, Vol. 2, No. 1, 04.2003, p. 37-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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