Current approaches for the analysis of spindle organization

Stefanie Redemann, Sebastian Fürthauer, Michael Shelley, Thomas Müller-Reichert

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The organization of microtubules in spindles is complex and not fully understood. Here we report on current advances in generating 3D reconstructions of staged spindles by serial-section electron tomography, exemplified by the first mitotic spindle in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. We then review how advances in correlative light microscopy and quantitative electron tomography enable the development of theory and stochastic simulations, which describe how the microtubule organization in spindles emerges from their dynamics. We show how theory and simulations can be used to address long-standing questions in cell division research, advancing the field beyond a pure structural description of microtubules in spindles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent Opinion in Structural Biology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Electron Microscope Tomography
Microtubules
Spindle Apparatus
Caenorhabditis elegans
Cell Division
Microscopy
Embryonic Structures
Light
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Structural Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Current approaches for the analysis of spindle organization. / Redemann, Stefanie; Fürthauer, Sebastian; Shelley, Michael; Müller-Reichert, Thomas.

In: Current Opinion in Structural Biology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Redemann, Stefanie ; Fürthauer, Sebastian ; Shelley, Michael ; Müller-Reichert, Thomas. / Current approaches for the analysis of spindle organization. In: Current Opinion in Structural Biology. 2019.
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