Cultural Differences in Targets of Stigmatization Between Individual- and Group-Oriented Cultures

Hyeyoung Shin, John F. Dovidio, Jaime Napier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This research investigated cultural differences in stigmatization of out-groups representing Goffman's distinction between "tribal stigma" and "blemishes of character." We hypothesized that "group-oriented" (vs. individual-oriented) cultures would be more likely to stigmatize nonnormative groups, including tribal out-groups (people of a different race, immigrants/foreign workers) and out-groups with blemishes of character (homosexuals, heavy drinkers, drug addicts), because of higher value of behavioral conformity and/or lower value of uniqueness. Country-level analyses with nine individual-oriented and four group-oriented countries supported our hypotheses and revealed that the cultural value of uniqueness played a more influential role than behavioral conformity. We discuss implications and directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)98-108
Number of pages11
JournalBasic and Applied Social Psychology
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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Cultural Differences in Targets of Stigmatization Between Individual- and Group-Oriented Cultures. / Shin, Hyeyoung; Dovidio, John F.; Napier, Jaime.

In: Basic and Applied Social Psychology, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 98-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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