Crossing gender boundaries

from Lagash to Lowell

Rita P. Wright

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Deeply embedded cultural assumptions about appropriate women's and men's work have persisted throughout human history. Embedded in attitudes about professions and technologies are cultural notions of manhood and womanhood. In this paper, I discuss two examples, one from the ancient province of Lagash in present-day Iraq around 4,000 years ago and the other from mid-19th century America. These examples illustrate the hidden dimensions and gendered assumptions that underlay historical processes. They also demonstrate that barriers to change can be culturally mediated by employing effective strategies that balance present needs with prevailing perceptions about appropriate gendered workplaces and professions.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)260-265
    Number of pages6
    JournalInternational Symposium on Technology and Society
    StatePublished - 1999

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Engineering(all)

    Cite this

    Crossing gender boundaries : from Lagash to Lowell. / Wright, Rita P.

    In: International Symposium on Technology and Society, 1999, p. 260-265.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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