Criminal victimization and psychotic experiences: Cross-sectional associations in 35 low- and middle-income countries

J. E. Devylder, I. Kelleher, H. Oh, B. G. Link, Larry Yang, A. Koyanagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Criminal victimization has been associated with elevated risk for psychotic symptoms in the United Kingdom, but has not been studied in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Understanding whether crime exposure may play a role in the social etiology of psychosis could help guide prevention and intervention efforts. Method: We tested the hypothesis that criminal victimization would be associated with elevated odds of psychotic experiences in 35 LMICs (N = 146 999) using cross-sectional data from the World Health Organization World Health Survey. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations between criminal victimization and psychotic experiences. Results: Victimization was associated with greater odds of psychotic experiences, OR (95% CI) = 1.72 (1.50-1.98), and was significantly more strongly associated with psychotic experiences in non-urban, OR (95% CI) = 1.93 (1.60-2.33), compared to urban settings, OR (95% CI) = 1.48 (1.21-1.81). The association between victimization and psychosis did not change across countries with varying aggregated levels of criminal victimization. Conclusions: In the largest ever study of victimization and psychosis, the association between criminal victimization and psychosis appears to generalize across a range of LMICs and, therefore, across nations with a broad range of crime rates, degree of urban development, average per capita income, and racial/ethnic make-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalActa Psychiatrica Scandinavica
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Crime Victims
Psychotic Disorders
Crime
Urban Renewal
Health Surveys
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Crime
  • Crime victims
  • Epidemiology
  • Psychotic disorders
  • Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Criminal victimization and psychotic experiences : Cross-sectional associations in 35 low- and middle-income countries. / Devylder, J. E.; Kelleher, I.; Oh, H.; Link, B. G.; Yang, Larry; Koyanagi, A.

In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: Criminal victimization has been associated with elevated risk for psychotic symptoms in the United Kingdom, but has not been studied in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Understanding whether crime exposure may play a role in the social etiology of psychosis could help guide prevention and intervention efforts. Method: We tested the hypothesis that criminal victimization would be associated with elevated odds of psychotic experiences in 35 LMICs (N = 146 999) using cross-sectional data from the World Health Organization World Health Survey. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations between criminal victimization and psychotic experiences. Results: Victimization was associated with greater odds of psychotic experiences, OR (95{\%} CI) = 1.72 (1.50-1.98), and was significantly more strongly associated with psychotic experiences in non-urban, OR (95{\%} CI) = 1.93 (1.60-2.33), compared to urban settings, OR (95{\%} CI) = 1.48 (1.21-1.81). The association between victimization and psychosis did not change across countries with varying aggregated levels of criminal victimization. Conclusions: In the largest ever study of victimization and psychosis, the association between criminal victimization and psychosis appears to generalize across a range of LMICs and, therefore, across nations with a broad range of crime rates, degree of urban development, average per capita income, and racial/ethnic make-up.",
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