Cortical brightness adaptation when darkness and brightness produce different dynamical states in the visual cortex

Dajun Xing, Chun I. Yeh, James Gordon, Robert Shapley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Darkness and brightness are very different perceptually. To understand the neural basis for the visual difference, we studied the dynamical states of populations of neurons in macaque primary visual cortex when a spatially uniform area (8° × 8°) of the visual field alternated between black and white. Darkness evoked sustained nerve-impulse spiking in primary visual cortex neurons, but bright stimuli evoked only a transient response. A peak in the local field potential (LFP) γ band (30-80 Hz) occurred during darkness; white-induced LFP fluctuations were of lower amplitude, peaking at 25 Hz. However, the sustained response to white in the evoked LFP was larger than for black. Together with the results on spiking, the LFP results imply that, throughout the stimulus period, bright fields evoked strong net sustained inhibition. Such cortical brightness adaptation can explain many perceptual phenomena: interocular speeding up of dark adaptation, tonic interocular suppression, and interocular masking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1210-1215
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume111
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 21 2014

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Darkness
Visual Cortex
Dark Adaptation
Neurons
Macaca
Visual Fields
Action Potentials
Population

Keywords

  • Cortical inhibition
  • Laminar pattern
  • Light adaptation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Cortical brightness adaptation when darkness and brightness produce different dynamical states in the visual cortex. / Xing, Dajun; Yeh, Chun I.; Gordon, James; Shapley, Robert.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 111, No. 3, 21.01.2014, p. 1210-1215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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