Correspondence between telephone and written assessments of physical violence in marriage

Erika Lawrence, Richard Heyman, K. Daniel O'Leary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Clinic couples (N = 50) participated in a study examining the consistency of reported rates of aggression via telephone and written administrations of the Conflict Tactics Scale. Both husbands' and wives' reports of physical aggression were highly consistent between the telephone and written assessments. Reports of wife-to-husband aggression were significantly more consistent than reports of husband-to-wife aggression. As expected, wives reported significantly more husband-to-wife aggression than their husbands reported. Generally, there were no significant sex differences on reports of wife-to-husband aggression. The implications of these findings for various studies are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)671-680
Number of pages10
JournalBehavior Therapy
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

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Marriage
Spouses
Telephone
Aggression
Physical Abuse
Sex Characteristics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Correspondence between telephone and written assessments of physical violence in marriage. / Lawrence, Erika; Heyman, Richard; O'Leary, K. Daniel.

In: Behavior Therapy, Vol. 26, No. 4, 1995, p. 671-680.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lawrence, Erika ; Heyman, Richard ; O'Leary, K. Daniel. / Correspondence between telephone and written assessments of physical violence in marriage. In: Behavior Therapy. 1995 ; Vol. 26, No. 4. pp. 671-680.
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