Correlates of hepatitis B vaccination in a high-risk population: An internet sample

Scott D. Rhodes, Ralph DiClemente, Leland J. Yee, Kenneth C. Hergenrather

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: We sought to identify factors associated with hepatitis B virus vaccination, including knowledge and attitudes about hepatitis vaccination, and sexual and nonsexual risk behaviors among at-risk homosexual and bisexual men. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Internet electronic communications were used to collect data from homosexual and bisexual men from the United States, using a 31-item online questionnaire accessible for 1 month. RESULTS: The mean (± SD) age of the 336 respondents was 38 ± 11 years. Nearly 42% (142) reported at least one dose of vaccine; the remainder were completely unvaccinated. About 21% (n = 71) reported having no information about hepatitis. Approximately 72% (242) of respondents reported never using condoms during oral intercourse, and 26% (n = 87) reported using condoms during less than half of their episodes of anal intercourse. In multivariate analysis, variables associated with vaccination were younger age (odds ratio [OR] 0.7 per 10-year increase in age; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59 to 0.84, P = 0.002), high level of knowledge about the vaccine (OR 1.4; 95% CI: 1.03 to 1.83, P = 0.007), communication with a health-care provider about hepatitis (OR 1.98; 95% CI 1.31 to 2.98, P = 0.006), and professional training that included hepatitis education (OR 2.77; 95% CI 1.7 to 4.5, P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings underscore the need for health care providers to emphasize vaccine efficacy and safety, and to encourage high-risk patients to receive vaccination, particularly among men at high risk based on sexual and drug use behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)628-632
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Medicine
Volume110
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2001

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Hepatitis B
Internet
Hepatitis
Vaccination
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Vaccines
Condoms
Health Personnel
Population
Communication
Risk-Taking
Hepatitis B virus
Multivariate Analysis
Safety
Education
Sexual Minorities
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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Correlates of hepatitis B vaccination in a high-risk population : An internet sample. / Rhodes, Scott D.; DiClemente, Ralph; Yee, Leland J.; Hergenrather, Kenneth C.

In: American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 110, No. 8, 01.06.2001, p. 628-632.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rhodes, Scott D. ; DiClemente, Ralph ; Yee, Leland J. ; Hergenrather, Kenneth C. / Correlates of hepatitis B vaccination in a high-risk population : An internet sample. In: American Journal of Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 110, No. 8. pp. 628-632.
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abstract = "PURPOSE: We sought to identify factors associated with hepatitis B virus vaccination, including knowledge and attitudes about hepatitis vaccination, and sexual and nonsexual risk behaviors among at-risk homosexual and bisexual men. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Internet electronic communications were used to collect data from homosexual and bisexual men from the United States, using a 31-item online questionnaire accessible for 1 month. RESULTS: The mean (± SD) age of the 336 respondents was 38 ± 11 years. Nearly 42{\%} (142) reported at least one dose of vaccine; the remainder were completely unvaccinated. About 21{\%} (n = 71) reported having no information about hepatitis. Approximately 72{\%} (242) of respondents reported never using condoms during oral intercourse, and 26{\%} (n = 87) reported using condoms during less than half of their episodes of anal intercourse. In multivariate analysis, variables associated with vaccination were younger age (odds ratio [OR] 0.7 per 10-year increase in age; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 0.59 to 0.84, P = 0.002), high level of knowledge about the vaccine (OR 1.4; 95{\%} CI: 1.03 to 1.83, P = 0.007), communication with a health-care provider about hepatitis (OR 1.98; 95{\%} CI 1.31 to 2.98, P = 0.006), and professional training that included hepatitis education (OR 2.77; 95{\%} CI 1.7 to 4.5, P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings underscore the need for health care providers to emphasize vaccine efficacy and safety, and to encourage high-risk patients to receive vaccination, particularly among men at high risk based on sexual and drug use behaviors.",
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