Correlates of depressive symptomatology among adult daughter caregivers of a parent with cancer

Victoria Raveis, Daniel G. Karus, Karolynn Siegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND. As a consequence of advances and changes in the detection arid treatment of cancer, increasing demands are being placed on familial caregivers of elderly cancer patients. Understanding the factors that place familial caregivers at risk of poor psychological outcomes and threaten their ability to provide adequate care is important for maintaining chronically ill patients in the community. METHODS. Dyads comprised of 164 cancer outpatients (ages 60-90 years) and their adult caregiving daughter completed structured telephone interviews. Hierarchical regression was used to determine the individual and cumulative effect of five domains of potential predictors on the daughters' depressive symptomatology (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale [CES-D]). RESULTS. The domains that were shown to be significantly predictive of a daughter's level of depressive symptomatology were daughter sociodemographics, constraints on/facilitators of caregiving, and caregiver burden. The domains of disease/patient characteristics and the daughter's appraisal of the caregiving situation were not found to be significant. The total model suggests that having a health-limiting condition, a greater sense of filial obligation, and greater caregiver burden were correlated with higher CES-D scores, whereas having graduated college, having other social roles, having favorable attitudes regarding her caregiving experience, and providing care in a greater number of domains of care were correlated with lower scores. CONCLUSIONS. These findings demonstrate the importance of focusing on situational factors that may function to constrain or facilitate caregiving when investigating caregiver depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1652-1663
Number of pages12
JournalCancer
Volume83
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 1998

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Adult Children
Caregivers
Nuclear Family
Neoplasms
Depression
Epidemiologic Studies
Aptitude
Chronic Disease
Outpatients
Interviews
Psychology
Health

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Cancer treatment
  • Caregiving
  • Depression
  • Elderly
  • Familial caregiving

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Correlates of depressive symptomatology among adult daughter caregivers of a parent with cancer. / Raveis, Victoria; Karus, Daniel G.; Siegel, Karolynn.

In: Cancer, Vol. 83, No. 8, 15.10.1998, p. 1652-1663.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raveis, Victoria ; Karus, Daniel G. ; Siegel, Karolynn. / Correlates of depressive symptomatology among adult daughter caregivers of a parent with cancer. In: Cancer. 1998 ; Vol. 83, No. 8. pp. 1652-1663.
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