Correlates of attitudes concerning human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome among hospital workers

Robyn Gershon, Barbara Curbow, Gabor Kelen, Dave Celantano, Kate Lears, David Vlahov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Correlates of attitudes related to HIV and AIDS for both clinical and nonclinical support hospital workers have not been well described. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among employees of an acute care, inner-city hospital to assess attitudes related to HIV and AIDS. Results: A 51% response rate was obtained, with completed questionnaires obtained from 321 clinical workers and 245 nonclinical workers. The proportions tolerant of patients with HIV infection were 83% and 78%, respectively. Factors associated with a tolerant attitude in clinical workers included personally knowing someone with AIDS, high scores on general AIDS knowledge, high knowledge scores on modes of transmission, low levels of fear, and accurate perceptions of occupational risk. In nonclinical workers, factors associated with tolerance included having been tested for HIV, personally knowing someone with AIDS, accurate perceptions of occupational risk, low levels of fear, high scores on general AIDS knowledge, and high knowledge scores on modes of transmission. Conclusions: Although the study was cross-sectional, the data suggest potentially modifiable factors associated with AIDS-related attitudes. These factors may be amenable to intervention among both clinical and nonclinical support hospital employees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-299
Number of pages7
JournalAJIC: American Journal of Infection Control
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
HIV
Fear
Cross-Sectional Studies
Urban Hospitals
HIV Infections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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Correlates of attitudes concerning human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome among hospital workers. / Gershon, Robyn; Curbow, Barbara; Kelen, Gabor; Celantano, Dave; Lears, Kate; Vlahov, David.

In: AJIC: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 22, No. 5, 01.01.1994, p. 293-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gershon, Robyn ; Curbow, Barbara ; Kelen, Gabor ; Celantano, Dave ; Lears, Kate ; Vlahov, David. / Correlates of attitudes concerning human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome among hospital workers. In: AJIC: American Journal of Infection Control. 1994 ; Vol. 22, No. 5. pp. 293-299.
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